Innovating with Integrity: How Local Heroes Are Transforming American Government

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Georgetown University Press, Aug 1, 1998 - Political Science - 368 pages
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Innovating with Integrity presents a comprehensive portrait of the local heroes—front-line public servants and middle managers—who are reinventing state and local government, and it offers practical recommendations for innovating successfully.

Based on a study of more than 200 successful government innovations, this book is the first large-scale, systematic analysis of innovation in American government. Sandford Borins identifies the components of integrity that he finds in successful innovators, including the intellectual discipline to plan rigorously and to establish measurable goals; the ability to collaborate with others and accommodate criticism; and a willingness to mobilize both the private sector and the community. In addition to analyzing the common traits driving new initiatives, Borins shows the distinctive differences among six areas of innovation: information technology, organizational redesign, environmental and energy management, policing and community development, social services, and education. This trenchant analysis of what initiatives actually work and why contributes to both the practice and theory of public management. Its practical advice will be especially valuable for front-line government workers, public managers, union leaders, agency heads, politicians, and all concerned with reforming government.

 

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Finally a tell all book that should be on every activist bookshelf. This book should be read by the general public but that is our job to bring this to their attention. I can't say enough about the well thought out structure and meticulous research. ~ W.A.STOFER

Contents

INNOVATIONS IN GOVERNANCE
177
LARGE PARTNERSHIPS
180
CONCLUSION
184
Dances with Business Environmental and Energy Management
188
VOLUNTARY COMPLIANCE
190
CREATING MARKETS
192
USING APPROPRIATE TECHNOLOGY
193
ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTS LOCAL HEROES
195

The Who Why and How of Innovation
37
FRONTLINE AND MIDDLE MANAGEMENT PUBLIC SERVANTS
39
CITIZENS ACTING FROM OUTSIDE THE PUBLIC SECTOR
40
WHY INNOVATE?
41
THE HOW OF INNOVATION
49
CONCLUSION
63
Obstacles Overcome Problems Persisting
66
RESPONDING TO CRITICS
79
THE CRITIC WITHIN
82
FACING THE FUTURE
85
CONCLUSION
89
Financing and Organizing Innovations
92
THE CHOICE OF ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURES
96
CONCLUSION
101
Results Verification and Replication
103
VERIFYING THE INNOVATIONS
111
DETERMINANTS OF AWARDS AND REPLICATION
116
CONCLUSION
119
PART 2
121
On Being an Innovator
123
Life in the Fast Lane Innovation through Information Technology
131
A DIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGIES
132
THE FUNCTIONS OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
136
THE SCOPE AND COST OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY PROJECTS
137
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGYS LOCAL HEROES
139
IMPLEMENTING CHANCE
143
ACHIEVING RESULTS
145
CONCLUSION
148
Revolution from Within Organizational Change
152
TURNAROUNDS
153
NEW WAYS OF WORKING AND MANAGING
164
COMPETITION WITHIN THE PUBLIC SECTOR
174
OVERCOMING OBSTACLES
202
ACHIEVING RESULTS
204
CONCLUSION
206
We Are Family Community Building
210
POLICING
211
RECLAIMING THE GHETTO
221
OTHER HOUSING INITIATIVES
230
CONCLUSION
232
Facing the Toughest Challenges Social Services
236
TYPES OF SOCIAL SERVICE INNOVATIONS
237
CHARACTERISTICS OF SOCIAL SERVICE INNOVATIONS
243
THE INFLUENCE OF THEORY
249
RESISTANCE TO CHANGE
252
ACHIEVING RESULTS
254
THE DILEMMA OF SOCIAL SERVICE INNOVATIONS
256
CONCLUSION
259
Everybodys Business Innovation in Education
261
TYPES OF EDUCATIONAL INNOVATION
262
TARGET POPULATIONS AND RESOURCEINTENSIVENESS
265
PART OF MANY AGENDAS
267
THEORYDRIVEN INNOVATION
270
OPPOSITION TO EDUCATIONAL INNOVATION
272
ACHIEVING RESULTS
279
CONCLUSION
280
Some Final Words for Practitioners and Academics
283
THE RESEARCH AGENDAQUESTIONS WORTH PURSUING
289
The Innovations Awards Questionnaire
295
Notes
299
References
307
Index
333
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Page 22 - Second, regardless of the origin of innovations, they inevitably send out ripples and reverberations to other organization units, "whose behavior may be required to change in light of the needs of innovations, or whose cooperation is necessary if an innovation is to be fully developed or exploited. Or there may be the need to generate unexpected...
Page 22 - ... on current products, or of the advocates of a competing direction. (Fast, 1979, for example, argues that "political" problems are the primary cause for the failure of corporate New Venture Departments.) 4. The innovation process crosses boundaries. An innovation process is rarely if ever contained solely "within one unit. First, there is evidence that many of the best ideas are interdisciplinary or interfunctional in origin — as connoted by the root meaning of entrepreneurship as the development...
Page 9 - This new paradigm is not reducible to a few sentences, let alone a slogan," argues Borins. Nevertheless, he suggests, it contains five "key ideas": — Government should provide high-quality services that citizens value. — The autonomy of public managers, particularly from central agency controls, should be increased. — Organizations and individuals should be evaluated and rewarded on the basis of how well they meet demanding performance targets. — Managers must be assured that the human and...
Page 30 - We must endeavor to coordinate these programs — both within the public sector and between the public and private sectors.

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About the author (1998)

Sandford Borins is a professor of public management and chair of the division of management at the University of Toronto at Scarborough. He is a former visiting professor at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University and the author of several books, including Political Management in Canada (McGraw-Hill Ryerson, 1992). His research focuses on international comparisons of public management reform initiatives. He has extensive experience designing training programs and consulting on public management for the Canadian government.

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