Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Front Cover
Harper Collins, May 9, 2006 - Business & Economics - 288 pages
8 Reviews

Peter Drucker's classic book on innovation and entrepreneurship

This is the first book to present innovation and entrepreneurship as a purposeful and systematic discipline that explains and analyzes the challenges and opportunities of America's new entrepreneurial economy. Superbly practical, Innovation and Entrepreneurship explains what established businesses, public service institutions, and new ventures need to know and do to succeed in today's economy.

 

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INNOVATION AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP: Practice And Principles

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

At a guess, Drucker's latest contribution to management literature will command appreciably less than half the attention being lavished on A Passion for Excellence (422). His substantive, systematic ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - markdeo - LibraryThing

An entrepreneur classic. Tremendous insight from an innovative opportunity & entrepreneurial management standpoint. As always, I highly recommend all of Peter Drucker's books. Read full review

Contents

The Entrepreneurial Economy
1
THE PRACTICE OF INNOVATION
19
Systematic Entrepreneurship
21
Purposeful Innovation and the Seven Sources for Innovative Opportunity
30
The Unexpected
37
Incongruities
57
Process Need
69
Industry and Market Structures
76
The Bright Idea
130
Principles of Innovation
133
THE PRACTICE OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP
141
Entrepreneurial Management
143
The Entrepreneurial Business
147
Entrepreneurship in the Service Institution
177
The New Venture
188
ENTREPRENEURIAL STRATEGIES
207

Demographics
88
Changes in Perception
99
New Knowledge
107
The Entrepreneurial Society
253
Suggested Readings
267
Copyright

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Page 19 - Innovation is the specific tool of entrepreneurs, the means by which they exploit change as an opportunity for a different business or a different service. It is capable of being presented as a discipline, capable of being learned, capable of being practiced.
Page 12 - It may still be the case that if you build a better mousetrap the world will beat a path to your door.
Page 35 - The incongruity — between reality as it actually is and reality as it is assumed to be or as it "ought to be"; • Innovation based on process need; ' Changes in industry structure or market structure that catch everyone unawares.
Page 35 - systematic innovation' consists in the purposeful and organized search for changes, and in the systematic analysis of the opportunities such changes might offer for economic or social innovation.
Page 228 - Quality" in a product or service is not what the supplier puts in. It is what the customer gets out and is willing to pay for. A product is not "quality" because it is hard to make and costs a lot of money, as manufacturers typically believe.
Page 179 - ... do good." This means that they tend to see their mission as a moral absolute rather than as economic and subject to a cost/benefit calculus. Economics always seeks a different allocation of the same resources to obtain a higher yield. In the public-service institution, there is no such thing as a higher yield. If one is "doing good," then there is no "better." Indeed, failure to attain objectives in the quest for a "good" only means that efforts need to be redoubled.
Page 21 - Say to characterize a special economic actor — not someone who simply opens a business, but someone who "shifts economic resources out of an area of lower and into an area of higher productivity and greater yield" [footnote omitted] Bornstein describes (pp.
Page 28 - Entrepreneurs, by definition, shift resources from areas of low productivity and yield to areas of higher productivity and yield.
Page 135 - Because innovation is both conceptual and perceptual, would-be innovators must also go out and look, ask, and listen. Successful innovators use both the right and left sides of their brains. They look at figures. They look at people. They work out analytically what the innovation has to be to satisfy an opportunity. Then they go out and look at potential users to study their expectations, their values, and their needs. To be effective, an innovation has to be simple and it has to be focused. It should...
Page 3 - We are indeed in the stages of a major technological transformation, one that is far more sweeping than the most ecstatic of the futurologists yet realize, greater even than Megatrends or Future Shock. Three hundred years of technology came to an end after World War II. During those three centuries the model for technology was a mechanical one: the events that go on inside a star such as the sun... Since the end of World War II, however, the model of technology has become the biological process,...

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About the author (2006)

Peter F. Drucker is considered the most influential management thinker ever. The author of more than twenty-five books, his ideas have had an enormous impact on shaping the modern corporation. Drucker passed away in 2005.

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