Innovations in Instructional Technology: Essays in Honor of M. David Merrill

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J. Michael Spector, Celestia Ohrazda, Andrew Van Schaack, David A. Wiley
Routledge, Apr 21, 2006 - Computers - 384 pages
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M. David Merrill has been active in the field of instructional technology for almost 40 years. His contributions range from basic instructional principles and instructional design theory to development and implementation of learning environments. Innovations in Instructional Technology is a collection of original essays written by leading scholars and practitioners who have worked with and been inspired by Professor Merrill. The chapters in this book represent a sampling of key innovations in the instructional technology field and include knowledge of how people learn, how people solve problems, how designers conceptualize learning spaces, how teachers implement learning activities, and how evaluators assess outcomes.

This volume is divided into five basic areas of research in instructional technology, mirroring the diverse contributions of Dr. Merrill's work:
*four chapters on learning objects and the notion of reusable components;
*three chapters that discuss fundamental aspects of learning and the design of instruction;
*three chapters that address innovations in the area of assessment, evaluation, and model validation;
*three chapters that concern theories of learning and instruction; and
*three chapters on instructional design practice.

The book concludes with a chapter outlining Dr. Merrill's responses to challenges, comments, and questions on the future of the field--ranging from the notion of initial passions with regard to instructional technology to connections between theory and practice to questions of conscience--from an expert panel comprised of many of the contributors to the book.

As Dave Merrill's work will continue to be required reading for students of instructional technology, Innovations in Instructional Technology is a book that will appeal to students, researchers, and practitioners in the field.
 

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Contents

Foreword
Acknowledgments
Learning Objects in Public and Higher Education
An Introduction toThis
HocusPocus
TheEnterprise
Assessment and Instruction
Validating Instructional Design and Development Models
New Instructional Theories and Strategies for a KnowledgeBased
A Historical Perspective
Reclaiming the Conversation
Confessions of a Practitioner
Slaying DragonsAn Interview With
Glossary
Author Index
Subject Index

Cognition and Instructional Design for ProblemBased Learning

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About the author (2006)

J. Michael Spector is Professor and Chair of Learning Technologies in the College of Information at the University of North Texas. He was previously Professor of Educational Psychology and Instructional Technology, Doctoral Program Coordinator for the Learning, Design, and Technology Program, and a Research Scientist at the Learning and Performance Support Laboratory at the University of Georgia (2009-2011). Previously, he was Associate Director of the Learning Systems Institute, Professor of Instructional Systems, and Principal Investigator for the International Center for Learning, Education and Performance Systems at Florida State University (2004-2008). He served as Chair of Instructional Design, Development and Evaluation at Syracuse University (2000-2004) and Director of the Educational Information Science and Technology Research Program at the University of Bergen (1996-1999). He is a distinguished graduate of the United States Air Force Academy and earned a Ph.D. in Philosophy from The University of Texas at Austin (1978). His recent research is in the areas of intelligent support for instructional design, system dynamics based learning environments, assessing learning in complex domains, distance learning, and technology integration in education. Dr. Spector served on the International Board of Standards for Training, Performance and Instruction ("ibstpi") as Executive Vice President; he is on the Executive Committee of the IEEE Learning Technology Technical Committee, is a Past President of the Association for Educational and Communications Technology (AECT) as well as a Past Chair of the Technology, Instruction, Cognition and Learning Special Interest Group of the American Educational Research Association. He is the editor (10th year as editor) of the Development Section of "Educational Technology Research & Development, " and he serves on numerous other editorial boards. He co-edited the third edition of the "Handbook of Research on Educational Communications and Technology", is again lead editor on the fourth edition, and has more than 100 journal articles, book chapters and books to his credit. Dr. Spector is active in international educational technology developments and was the Conference Co-Chair and Local Organizer for the 2011 IEEE International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies held at UGA 6-8 July.

David A. Wiley is a Professor in the Education Department at the University of Scranton in Scranton PA. After teaching science for more than fourteen years, he moved to the University in 1988. He has served as Department Chair for over nine years, is now serving as Certification Officer, and was a co-author of the assessment plan used with teacher candidates at the University of Scranton. His research interests include mathematics and science education, technology education, and teacher effectiveness in the classroom setting. He has authored more than forty articles and three previous books in his areas of expertise. He has presented at the Pennsylvania and the National Science Teachers Associations, at the American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education, and meetings of many other organizations. His service agenda is heavy in the area of teacher preparation and working with science teacher professional associations. Dr. Wiley is married, the father of a son and three daughters, and lives in Clarks Summit, PA where, in his spare time, he volunteers with the Clarks Summit Fire Company.

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