Inorganic Chemistry: An Industrial and Environmental Perspective

Front Cover
Elsevier, Mar 26, 1997 - Science - 482 pages
This book addresses the question, What is inorganic chemistry good for? rather than the more traditional question, How can we develop a theoretical basis for inorganic chemistry from sophisticated theories of bonding? The book prepares students of science or engineering for entry into the multi-billion-dollar inorganic chemical and related industries, and for rational approaches to environmental problems such as pollution abatement, corrosion control, and water treatment. A much expanded and updated revision of the 1990 text, Applied Inorganic Chemistry (University of Calgary Press), Inorganic Chemistry covers topics including atmospheric pollution and its abatement, water conditioning, fertilizers, cement chemistry, extractive metallurgy, metallic corrosion, catalysts, fuel cells and advanced batter technology, pulp and paper production, explosives, supercritical fluids, sol-gel science, materials for electronics, and superconductors. Though the book waswritten as a textbook for undergraduates with a background of freshman chemistry, it will also be a valuable sourcebook for practicing chemists, engineers, environmental scientists, geologists, and educators.

Key Features
* Presents the principles of inorganic chemistry in terms of its relevance to the real world of industry and environmental protection
* Serves as a concise reference for practicing scientists, engineers, and educators
* Emphasizes industrially relevant energetics and kinetics rather than bonding theories
* Features extensive cross-referencing for easy location of supporting material
 

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nice book

Contents

Chapter 1 Importance of Inorganic Chemistry
1
Chapter 2 Chemical Energetics
11
Chapter 3 Catenation Inorganic Macromolecules
51
Chapter 4 Crystalline Solids
69
Chapter 5 The Defect Solid State
95
Chapter 6 Inorganic Solids as Heterogeneous Catalysts
115
Chapter 7 Silicates Aluminates and Phosphates
129
Chapter 8 The Atmosphere and Atmospheric Pollution
153
Chapter 15 Oxidation and Reduction in Solution
285
Chapter 16 Corrosion of Metals
327
Chapter 17 Extractive Metallurgy
357
Chapter 18 Organometallics
391
Chapter 19 Some Newer Solidstate Technologies
411
Appendix A Useful Constants
431
Standard Atomic Masses
433
Appendix C Chemical Thermodynamic Data
437

Chapter 9 Nitrogen Phosphorus and Potash in Agriculture
179
Chapter 10 Sulfur and Sulfur Compounds
191
Chapter 11 Alkalis and Related Products
205
Chapter 12 The Halogens
221
Chapter 13 Ions in Solution
237
Chapter 14 Water Conditioning
263
Appendix D Standard Electrode Potentials for Aqueous Solutions
451
Appendix E Nomenclature of Coordination Compounds
457
Appendix F Ionic Radii
459
Index
461
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

Thomas W. Swaddle received his B.Sc. at University College London in 1958, and his Ph.D. at the University of Leicester in 1961. He held two post-doctoral appointments in the United States before joining the academic staff at the University of Calgary in 1964. Swaddle has been a full professor at that institution since 1974. He is a Fellow of The Chemical Institute of Canada, The Royal Society of Chemistry, and The American Association for the Advancement of Science. Swaddle is a member of The American Chemical Society and Sigma Xi, and was made a Senior Fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science in 1984. He is also Wilsmore Fellow of the University of Melbourne (1988), and Killam Resident Fellow at the University of Calgary (1995). Swaddle has authored more than 100 research articles; this is his second book.