Inorganic Nanoprobes for Biological Sensing and Imaging

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Artech House, 2009 - Technology & Engineering - 302 pages
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This groundbreaking resource offers you an up-to-date account of the pioneering activity pushing new boundaries in the emerging area of inorganic nanoprobes and their use in biology and medicine. Written and edited by leading experts in the field, this unique book places particular emphasis nanoprobes made of luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots or QDs) and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). You find an insightful discussion on the synthesis, characterization, and analysis of the unique properties of luminescent QDs and MNPs.
 

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Contents

Colloidal Quantum Dots Synthesis Photophysical Properties and Biofunctionalization Strategies
1
12 Chemistry and Physics of Semiconductor Quantum Dots
2
122 Synthesis Characterization and Capping Strategies
4
13 Strategies for SurfaceFunctionalization and Conjugation to Biomolecules
13
132 Methods for Conjugating QDs with Biomolecular Receptors
18
14 Concluding Remarks and Future Outlook
19
Acknowledgments
20
References
21
732 Effects of Capping Materials on Cytotoxicity
140
733 Effects of QD Size on Cytotoxicity
141
734 Effects of Reactive Oxygen Species on Cytotoxicity
142
735 Effects of QDs on Genomic DNA
147
74 Bioaccumulation and Clearance of QDs
150
75 Outlook
153
Acknowledgments
154
Chemical and Biological Sensing Based on Gold Nanoparticles
161

Colloidal Chemical Synthesis of OrganicDispersible Uniform Magnetic Nanoparticles
27
22 Transition Metal Nanoparticles
30
222 Iron and Nickel Nanoparticles
32
23 Metal Alloy Nanoparticles
33
232 Other Metal Alloy Nanoparticles
34
24 Metal Oxide Nanoparticles
35
242 Bimetallic Ferrite Nanoparticles
38
25 Representative Synthetic Procedures for Magnetic Nanoparticles
39
252 Iron Oxide Nanoparticles
40
References
41
PeptideFunctionalized Quantum Dots for Live Diagnostic Imaging and Therapeutic Applications
45
The AllinOne Solubilization Functionalization Approach
47
33 Colloidal and Photophysical Properties of PeptideCoated Qdots
50
34 Live Cell Dynamic Imaging
52
342 PeptideMediated Intracellular Delivery and Targeting of Qdots
54
35 Live Animal Imaging
55
351 NearInfrared DeepTissue DualModality Imaging
56
352 In Vivo Targeting of Tumor Vasculature
57
Sensing and Therapeutic Applications
59
362 Photodynamic Therapy
61
37 Conclusion and Perspectives
63
Acknowledgments
64
Resonance Energy TransferBased Sensing Using Quantum Dot Bioconjugates
71
42 Unique Attributes of Quantum Dots As FRET Donors
73
422 Significant Reduction of Direct Excitation of the Acceptor
74
424 Achieving Multiplex FRET Configurations with One Excitation Source
76
425 Multiphoton FRET Configurations
77
43 FRETBased Biosensing with Quantum Dots
79
432 Sensing Enzymatic Activity Using QDPeptide and QDOligonucleotide Substrates
82
433 Detection of Hybridization Using QDNucleic Acid Conjugates
85
434 pH and Ion Sensing
88
44 Quantum Dots As Sensitizers for Photodynamic Therapy
91
45 Special Sensing Configurations
93
46 Conclusions and Outlook
96
Acknowledgments
97
Use of Luminescent Quantum Dots to Image and Initiate Biological Functions
101
52 Multivalency Allows Multifunctionality
103
53 StimuliResponsive Polymers and Qds As Tools for Imaging
109
54 Conclusions
110
Acknowledgments
111
Single Particle Investigation of Biological Processes Using QDBioconjugates
115
62 Physical Properties of Single QDs
116
631 Detection of Biomolecules Using Multicolor Colocalization of QD Probes
117
632 Colocalization Studies Using StreptavidinCoupled QDDye Pairs
119
642 Tracking of Protein Receptors in Live Cells
126
65 Conclusion
129
References
130
Assessment of the Issues Related to the Toxicity of Quantum Dots
133
72 General Considerations
134
722 Mechanisms of Cellular Internalization of QDs
135
723 Detection of QDInduced Cytotoxicity
136
73 Mechanisms of Quantum Dots Cytotoxicity
138
82 Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles
162
83 Physical Properties of Gold Nanoparticles
164
84 Colorimetric Sensing
165
841 Colorimetric Detection of Metal Ions and Anions
166
842 Colorimetric Detection of Biomaterials
167
85 Fluorescence Sensing
170
86 Electrical and Electrochemical Sensing
172
87 Surface Enhanced Raman ScatteringBased Sensing
179
88 Gold NanoparticleAmplified SPR Sensing
180
89 Quartz Crystal MicrobalanceBased Sensing
181
810 Gold NanoparticleBased BioBarcode Assay
182
811 Concluding Remarks
183
Acknowledgments
185
PlasmonResonant Gold Nanorods Photophysical Properties Applied Toward Biological Imaging and Therapy
197
92 Synthesis
198
93 Optical Properties
200
932 PlasmonResonant Scattering
202
934 Nonlinear Optical Properties
203
935 Other Optical Properties
205
94 Surface Chemistry and Biocompatibility
206
942 Cytotoxicity and Nonspecific Cell Uptake
208
95 Biological Applications of Gold Nanorods
209
952 Photothermal Therapy
213
953 Ex Vivo Bioanalytical Applications
215
96 Outlook
217
References
218
Magnetic Nanoparticles in Biomedical Applications
235
103 Magnetic Resonance Imaging MRI Contrast Agent
237
104 Magnetic Separation
241
105 Magnetic Drug Delivery
245
106 Conclusions
247
Magnetic NanoparticlesAssisted Cellular MR Imaging and Their Biomedical Applications
251
112 Characterization of MRI Contrast Agents or Magnetic Nanoparticles Used in Cell Labeling for CMRI
252
1122 Superparamagnetic Agents
253
113 Methods for Labeling Cells with Magnetic Nanoparticles for CMRI
256
1132 Modified Nanoparticles for Cell Labeling
257
1133 Transfection Agent Mediated Cell Labeling
260
114 Methods to Monitor the Functional Status of Labeled Cells or Toxicity Following Labeling
261
1141 Determination of Cell Viability
262
115 MRI Techniques to Detect Cells Labeled with Superparamagnetic Iron Oxides
263
116 Animal Studies That Have Utilized CMRI
265
1163 Tumor Angiogenesis
266
1164 Stroke and Trauma Models
268
1165 Myocardial Infarction and Vascular Models
269
1166 Models of Multiple Sclerosis
272
117 Translation to the Clinic
273
1172 Regulatory Issues
274
References
276
About the Editors
289
List of Contributors
290
Index
293
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Hedi Mattoussi is the principle investigator in the Institute of Nanoscience at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). His activity at NRL focuses on the development of inorganic nanoparticles and their interfacing with biological systems. Dr. Mattoussi earned his Ph.D. in condensed matter physics from Pierre and Marie Curie University, Paris.

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