Inquiry in the Classroom: Realities and Opportunities

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Eleanor Abrams, Sherry A. Southerland, Peggy Clohessy Silva
IAP, 2008 - Education - 265 pages
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The goal of this text is to help you navigate the complex landscape that is inquiry in the science classroom. We focus on inquiry teaching, its various forms and what factors influence its integration into a classroom. We invite you to develop and refine your definitions about scientific inquiry and explore how inquiry might be used to support the success of your students. The introduction will include various definitions of inquiry offered in the research literature accompanied by what we see as useful ways to conceptualize the broad practices that comprise inquiry in the classroom. Following the introduction the six sections of the book each explore factors that influence the use of inquiry in the classroom. Each section begins with one (or more) vignette--snippets of science classrooms. The authors discuss how this vignette demonstrates some aspect of the specific dimension that they are charged with discussing. Because inquiry is so multifaceted and its portrayals are often complex and nuanced, the discussion of the dimension is broken into separate essays-- each of which addresses the focal dimension in different ways. Following the essay, a broader discussion across the essays is offered to support your understanding of inquiry.
 

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Contents

IV
3
V
4
VI
7
VII
18
VIII
25
IX
37
X
39
XI
41
XXV
144
XXVI
148
XXVII
150
XXVIII
157
XXIX
165
XXX
169
XXXI
171
XXXII
172

XII
45
XIII
53
XIV
64
XV
79
XVI
89
XVII
91
XVIII
93
XIX
97
XX
107
XXI
117
XXII
130
XXIII
141
XXIV
143
XXXIII
177
XXXIV
191
XXXV
204
XXXVI
216
XXXVII
231
XXXVIII
233
XXXIX
234
XL
238
XLI
243
XLII
248
XLIII
252
XLIV
267
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Page xiv - Mastery of the fundamental ideas of a field involves not only the grasping of general principles, but also the development of an attitude toward learning and inquiry, toward guessing and hunches, toward the possibility of solving problems on one's own.
Page xvii - Inquiry is a multifaceted activity that involves making observations; posing questions; examining books and other sources of information to see what is already known; planning investigations; reviewing what is already known in light of experimental evidence; using tools to gather, analyze, and interpret data; proposing answers, explanations, and predictions; and communicating the results.
Page xvi - Scientific inquiry refers to the diverse ways in which scientists study the natural world and propose explanations based on the evidence derived from their work

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