Inquisitio Philosophica: An Examination of the Principles of Kant and Hamilton

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Chapman and Hall, 1866 - Absolute, The - 270 pages
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Page 71 - For he saith to Moses, I will have mercy on whom I will have mercy, and I will have compassion...
Page 146 - As the conditionally limited (which we may briefly call the conditioned) is thus the only possible object of knowledge and of positive thought — thought necessarily supposes conditions. To think is to condition ; and conditional limitation is the fundamental law of the possibility of thought.
Page 72 - Nay but, O man, who art thou that repliest against God ? Shall the thing formed say to him that formed it, Why hast thou made me thus...
Page 146 - ... mind cannot transcend that sphere of limitation, within and through which exclusively the possibility of thought is realized. Thought is only of the conditioned ; because, as we have said, to think is simply to condition. The absolute is conceived merely by a negation of conceivability ; and all that we know, is only known as ' won from the void and formless infinite.
Page 12 - He that planted the ear, shall he not hear? he that formed the eye, shall he not see?
Page 72 - What if God, willing to show his wrath, and to make his power known, endured with much long-suffering the vessels of wrath fitted to destruction.
Page 71 - The rest of mankind God was pleased, according to the unsearchable counsel of his own will, (whereby he extendeth or withholdeth mercy, as he pleaseth, for the glory of his sovereign power over his creatures,) to pass by, and to ordain them to dishonour and wrath for their sin, to the praise of his glorious justice.
Page 147 - The conditioned is the mean between two extremes— two inconditionates, exclusive of each other, neither of which can be conceived as possible, but of which, on the principles of contradiction and excluded middle, one must be admitted as necessary.
Page 172 - Of things absolutely or in themselves— be they external, be they internal— we know nothing or know them as incognizable ; and become aware of their incomprehensible existence only as this is indirectly and accidentally revealed to us through certain qualities related to our faculties of knowledge, and which qualities, again, we cannot think as unconditioned, irrelative, existent in and of themselves. All that we know is therefore phenomenal — phenomenal of the unknown.
Page 146 - Imagination coincide), an infinite whole, for this could only be done by the infinite synthesis in thought of finite wholes, which would itself require an infinite time for its accomplishment ; nor, for the same reason, can we follow out in thought an infinite divisibility of parts. The result is the same, whether we apply the process to limitation in space, in time, or in degree. The unconditional negation, and the unconditional affirmation of limitation ; in other words, the Infinite and the Absolute,...

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