Inside CIA's Private World: Declassified Articles from the Agency's Internal Journal, 1955-1992

Front Cover
H. Bradford Westerfield
Yale University Press, 1995 - Political Science - 489 pages
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For forty years the Central Intelligence Agency has published an in-house journal, Studies in Intelligence, for CIA eyes only. Now the agency has declassified much of this material. This engrossing book, which presents the most interesting articles from the journal, provides revealing insights into CIA strategies and into events in which the organization was involved. The articles were selected by H. Bradford Westerfield, who teaches courses on intelligence operations but has never been affiliated with CIA. Westerfield's comprehensive introduction sketches the history and structure of CIA, sets the articles in context, and explains his criteria for selecting them. The articles cover a wide range of intelligence activities, including the gathering of intelligence data inside the United States; analysis of data; interaction between analysts and policymakers; the development of economic intelligence targeted at friendly countries as well as at foes; use of double agents (the personal memoir of a CIA officer who pretended to the Russians to be their agent); evaluation of defectors (the Nosenko case); and coercive interrogation techniques and how agents can resist them.
 

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Contents

II Overt Human Intelligence Collection Overt Humint
27
III Clandestine Human Intelligence Collection Clandestine Humint
49
IV Humint and Its Consumers
97
V The Analysis Function
205
VI Analysis and Its Consumers
331
VII Counterespionage
377
The Next Most Valuable Articles
479
Abbreviations Acronyms and Definitions
481
Acknowledgments
483
Index
485
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