BIOS Instant Notes in Sport and Exercise Biomechanics

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Garland Science, Mar 1, 2004 - Health & Fitness - 366 pages
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Instant Notes Sport and Exercise Biomechanics provides a comprehensive overview of the key concepts in exercise and sport biomechanics. The kinematics of motion are reviewed in detail, outlining the physics of motion. Mechanical characteristics of motion, the mechanisms of injury, and the analysis of the sport technique provides a source of valuable information.
 

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Contents

SECTION A KINEMATICS OF MOTION
1
SECTION B KINETICS OF LINEAR MOTION
59
SECTION C KINETICS OF ANGULAR MOTION
115
SECTION D SPECIAL TOPICS
211
SECTION E APPLICATIONS
247
SECTION F MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES
295
FREE BODY DIAGRAMS
363
SAMPLING THEOREM
365
MATHS REVISION ALGEBRAIC MANIPULATION
368
MATHS REVISION TRIGONOMETRY
376
INDEX
381
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About the author (2004)

Paul Grimshaw, School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia

Paul Grimshaw trained originally as a mechanical engineer with the Royal Ordnance before completing his degree (1984) and PhD in bioengineering (1989) from the University of Salford, UK. Throughout his 18 year career in academia he has lectured in the subject area of biomechanics at Brunel, Edinburgh and Exeter Universities in the UK. Currently he is working in the School of Health Sciences at the University of South Australia in Adelaide.

His research interests centre on the topics of injury prevention and biomechanical measurement techniques in sport and exercise. To date he has been involved in the publication of over 60 refereed pieces of work in these areas. His current research interests include the mechanical properties of the anterior cruciate ligament and the 3 dimensional analysis of the walking gait of patients following hip replacement. In his teaching career he has acted as external examiner to several institutions and organisations and has taught biomechanics, anatomy and statistics to a wide range of undergraduate and postgraduate students in the United Kingdom and Australia.

Adrian Lees, Dept of Exercise and Sport Science, Liverpool John Moores University

Neil Fowler, Dept of Exercise and Sport Science, Manchester Metropolitan University

Adrian Burden, Dept of Exercise and Sport Science, Manchester Metropolitan University

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