Integrated Optics: Theory and Technology

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Springer Science & Business Media, Apr 29, 2009 - Technology & Engineering - 513 pages
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Integrated Optics explains the subject of optoelectronic devices and their use in integrated optics and fiber optic systems. The approach taken is to emphasize the physics of how devices work and how they can be (and have been) used in various applications as the field of optoelectronics has progressed from microphotonics to nanophotonics. Illustrations and references from technical journals have been used to demonstrate the relevance of the theory to currently important topics in industry. By reading this book, scientists, engineers, students and engineering managers can obtain an overall view of the theory and the most recent technology in Integrated Optics.

 

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A good introduction to Integrated Optics. You don't need profound knowledge of Optics to digest this book.

Contents

to 1 Introduction
1
to 2 Optical Waveguide Modes
17
to 3 Theory of Optical Waveguides
32
to 4 Waveguide Fabrication Techniques
53
to 5 Polymer and Fiber Integrated Optics
85
to 6 Losses in Optical Waveguides
107
to 7 Waveguide Input and Output Couplers
129
to 8 Coupling Between Waveguides
153
to 13 Optical Amplifiers
259
to 14 Heterostructure ConfinedField Lasers
277
to 15 DistributedFeedback Lasers
303
to 16 Direct Modulation of Semiconductor Lasers
325
to 17 Integrated Optical Detectors
345
to 18 QuantumWell Devices
375
to 19 MicroOpticalElectroMechanical Devices
402
to 20 Applications of Integrated Optics and Current Trends
423

to 9 ElectroOptic Modulators
171
to 10 AcoustoOptic Modulators
201
to 11 Basic Principles of Light Emission in Semiconductors
221
to 12 Semiconductor Lasers
241
to 21 Photonic and Microwave Wireless Systems
451
to 22 Nanophotonics
469
Index
507
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About the author (2009)

The author has been working in the field of optoelectronics for over 40 years, first in industry (Hughes Research Laboratories, Malibu, CA) and later as a professor at the University of Delaware. In 1995, Dr. Hunsperger was made a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) in recognition of his work in the field.

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