Integrating China: Towards the Coordinated Market Economy

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Anthem Press, 2007 - Business & Economics - 268 pages
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China is becoming ever more deeply integrated with global political economy. This book addresses critical issues in this process. The author examines the paradox of the global market economy that is presided over by 70 million members of the Chinese Communist Party, and analyses China's policy of 'innovation in an open environment', attempting to nurture a group of globally competitive, large-scale companies.

In addition, the book analyses the challenges that China's political economy faces in the twenty-first century, identifying the way in which China is attempting to resolve these contradictions by building on its rich historical experience to regulate market forces. It further examines the wider context of global capitalism within which Chinese development is taking place. Capitalism is the key propulsive force in technical progress. The recent period has seen an unprecedented liberation of this force. However, this force is a two-edged sword. The unprecedented advances have come hand-in-hand with unprecedented challenges that threaten the very survival of the human species.

Finally, it studies the relationship between the United States and China. Through cooperative behaviour, the US and China can help lead the world towards a sustainable future for mankind, with a global market economy regulated in the common interest of all human beings. In the absence of such a mechanism, the prospects for humanity are bleak.

 

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Contents

The Global Business Revolution and Developing Countries
19
The Globalisation Challenge and the Catchup of
43
4 The Global Industrial Consolidation and the Challenge
71
Cutting the
95
China at the Crossroads
145
The Contradictory
177
USChina
231
Index
265
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About the author (2007)

Peter Nolan is Sinyi Professor of Chinese Management at the Judge Institute of Management, Cambridge University, and Fellow of Jesus College, Cambridge University.

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