Intellectual Property Deskbook for the Business Lawyer: A Transactions-based Guide to Intellectual Property Law

Pirmais vāks
The Intellectual Property Deskbook is intended to serve as the business lawyer's starting point for issue identification, perspective, and resources in dealing with intellectual property issues and assets, whether in the context of structuring and consummating transactions or in the day-to-day counseling of clients. It is specifically designed to become the go-to reference for beginning the analysis, refreshing the memory, or seeking direction for in depth research on the wide range of IP-related issues.
 

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Atlasītās lappuses

Saturs

IP Issues for Startup Companies
1
II Understanding the Basic Parameters of Intellectual Property Laws Big 4
2
III Naming Your Startup
3
B Checking the Availability of the Name
5
IV Trademark Law
6
B State Trademark Registration
8
C Federal Trademark Protection
9
D International Trademark Protection
10
Intellectual Property Due Diligence
123
II The IP Due Diligence Process
125
III Cooperation and Confidentiality
127
IV The Key Issues
128
A Identify What Rights
129
B Determining the Ownership of IP
130
C Identifying Transfers to Third Parties
132
D Ascertaining the Existence of Superior Interests
133

E Avoiding Liability for Trademark Infringement
11
V Copyright Law
12
B Copyrightable Subject Matter
13
C Ownership
14
D The Benefits of Registration and Notice
15
VI Trade Secret Laws
18
B Misappropriation of Trade Secrets
19
VII Patent Law
20
B Obtaining Patent Protection
21
C Avoiding Liability for Patent Infringement
22
VIII Intellectual Property Issues in the Employment Arena
23
IP Issues in Employment Law
25
II Ensuring Ownership of IP Created by Employees
27
B The Rules of IP Ownership
31
C Obtaining Ownership of IP for the Employer
33
D Protecting IP Rights Once They Are Secured
35
B Strategies That Are IPSpecific
37
C Litigation
41
IV Avoiding Liability to Third Parties
42
B Avoiding Infringement or Theft of IP
43
Security Interests in IP
45
II The Conflict Between State and Federal Law
49
A The Easy CaseTrade Secrets and Licensing Revenue
51
B The New CaseDomain Names
52
C The It Depends CaseCopyrights
54
D The Confusing Cases And the Case for Collateral Assignments
55
IP Issues with Software Financing
63
II Common SoftwareFinancing Structures
65
A License
67
B Support Services
71
C Other Services
72
Mixed Collateral
73
IV Financial Products
75
B Lease
78
C Factoring a Licensors Receivables
81
Licensing Intellectual Property
85
II The License Grant
87
B What Is the Licensed IP?
88
D Exclusivity
89
E Duration and Revocability
90
G Assignment and Transferability
91
H Other Restrictions
92
B Trademarks
93
C Patents
94
D Trade Secrets
95
IV Other Common Licensing Provisions
96
B Ownership of Derivative Works or Improvements
97
D Representations and Warranties
100
F Maintenance of IP Rights
101
IP Representations and Warranties
103
II An Overview of Representations Warranties and Indemnities
105
B Understanding the Meaning and Scope of an Indemnity
106
C Defining the IP Rights
107
III Specific Representations and Warranties
109
A Validity and Ownership
110
B Use and Infringement
114
C Disclosures and Qualifications
115
D The Special Case of Software
116
IV Indemnity Provisions
118
A Schedule AUnique Canadian IP Issues
119
B Schedule BUnique UKEU IP Issues
120
V Practice Tips
134
VI Evaluating the Collected Information
135
B How Was the Technology Developed and By Whom
136
C Rights in Software
137
D Special TradeSecret Concerns
138
E ThirdParty Interests
139
F Potential Hidden Liabilities
140
Protecting IP in Outsourcing Deals
141
II Overview of International IP
143
B Appreciating the IP Laws of Other Countries
144
CSpecial Issues Related to Offshore Outsourcing
147
D Outsourcing within the United States
148
III Tips for Structuring the Outsourcing Engagement
150
B Protecting Other Forms of IP
151
C Data Privacy
153
E Managing the Outsourcing Relationship
154
F Dispute Resolution
155
V Securing Ownership of IP Created in the Course of the Outsourcing Transaction
156
VI Remedies for a Service Providers Misappropriation
157
A Remedies Available under Current Chinese TradeSecrets Law
158
B Remedies Available under Current Indian TradeSecrets Law
159
VII Exit Strategy
161
Intellectual Property and Bankruptcy
163
II How Does Bankruptcy Affect Intellectual Property Licenses?
165
B Practice Tips
169
B Practice Tip
170
IV Can a License Be Assigned to a Third Party by a Bankruptcy Trustee or Debtor in Possession?
171
B Practice Tips
173
B Practice Tips
176
VI What Happens If a License Is Rejected by a Trustee or a Debtor in Possession?
177
B Practice Tips
182
VII Can Assumption Assignment and Rejection Issues Be Avoided by Ride Through?
183
B Practice Tips
185
IP Issues in Probate and Estate Planning
187
II Identifying Intellectual Property Assets
189
B Identifying Trademark and Service Mark Rights
195
C Identifying Patent Rights
196
D Trade Secrets
198
E Other Intangible Rights and IPRelated Rights
199
III The Duration of IP Rights
200
A Copyrights
201
B Trademark and Service Mark Rights
203
C Patents
204
D Trade Secrets
205
G Infringement Actions
206
B Trademark and Service Mark Rights
207
C Patents
208
E Rights of Publicity
209
OpenSource Software and IP
211
II Proprietary Versus OpenSource Models
213
III OpenSource Principles
215
IV Categories of OpenSource Licenses
218
B Academic LicensesNonreciprocal Licenses
219
D ContentCreative Commons Licenses
220
V Business and Legal Concerns Related to OpenSource Software
221
A Strategic and Operational Risks and Benefits
222
B Legal Risks
226
Bibliography
231
Index
245
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