Intellectual Property Rights and the Life Science Industries: Past, Present and Future

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World Scientific, 2009 - Law - 429 pages
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This book is a highly readable and entertaining account of the co-evolution of the patent system and the life science industries since the mid-19th century. The pharmaceutical industries have their origins in advances in synthetic chemistry and in natural products research. Both approaches to drug discovery and business have shaped patent law, as have the lobbying activities of the firms involved and their supporters in the legal profession. In turn, patent law has impacted on the life science industries. Compared to the first edition, which told this story for the first time, the present edition focuses more on specific businesses, products and technologies, including Bayer, Pfizer, GlaxoSmithKline, aspirin, penicillin, monoclonal antibodies and polymerase chain reaction. Another difference is that this second edition also looks into the future, addressing new areas such as systems biology, stem cell research, and synthetic biology, which promises to enable scientists to OC inventOCO life forms from scratch.
 

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Contents

Introduction
3
Seven Tales of a Patent
11
The Life Sciences Business and the Patent System
34
Past
57
Dyes Drugs and Domagk
59
Making Hormones
104
The Antibiotics
132
Present
155
No Patents on Life
191
Mr Pharma Goes to Geneva
236
The Story So Far
294
Would We Have Got Where We Are Today Without Patents?
325
Future
339
The Future of Patents and the Life Science Industries
341
Bibliography
363
Name Index
397

Big Pharma Small Biotech
157
Plate Section
183

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