Intellectual Capital: The New Wealth of Organizations

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Doubleday / Currency, Jan 1, 1997 - Business & Economics - 261 pages
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Knowledge has become the most important factor in economic life. It is the chief ingredient of what we buy and sell, the raw material we work with. Intellectual capital -- not natural resources, machinery, or even financial capital -- has become the one indispensable asset of corporations.

"Intellectual Capital" is a groundbreaking book, visionary in scope and immediately practical in application. It offers powerful new ways of looking at what companies do and how to lead them. This is the first book to show how to turn the untapped, unmapped knowledge of an organization into its greatest competitive weapon. It reveals how to unlock the value of hidden assets; how to find them in the talent of a company's people, the loyalty of its customers, and the collective knowledge embodied in an organization's culture, systems, and processes. And it shows how to manage these vital assets -- which until now have largely been ignored.

Dazzling in its ability to make conceptual sense of the economic revolution we are living through, "Intellectual Capital" cuts through the vague rhetoric of "paradigm shifts" to show how the Information Age economy really works -- and how to make it work for you and your business.

Thomas A. Stewart is an award-winning member of the board of editors of "Fortune" magazine. He pioneered the field of intellectual capital in a series of landmark articles that earned him an international reputation as the chief expert on the subject. The Planning Forum called him "the leading proponent of knowledge management in the business press, " and Business Intelligence, a British research group, gave him a special award for his outstanding contributions to the field.

Click here to visit the "Intellectual Capital" website.

"Tom Stewart has become a tycoon of intellectual capital, and this work sharesthe wealth and magnifies it. Buy the book and join the value chain."
--George Gilder, author of "Microcosm" and "Life After Television"

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User Review  - markdeo - LibraryThing

Very good introduction to business. Great reading on the information age. Good insight into Knowledge Management and Intellectual Capital All entrepreneur's, business people, managers, and employees will benefit from this book. I highly recommend. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jaygheiser - LibraryThing

p. 203 "Just as the value a business creates derives less from the physical assets it controls than from the knowledge it develops and applies, so the importance and value of a caree is marked not by hierarchical position--a badge of the assets one contro Read full review

Contents

Context
1
The Knowledge Economy
i
The Knowledge Company i B Chapter 3 The Knowledge Worker 3 7
37
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

Thomas A. Stewart is an award-winning member of the board of editors of Fortune magazine.  He pioneered the field of intellectual capital in a series of landmark articles that earned him an international reputation as the chief expert on the subject.  The Planning Forum called him "the leading proponent of knowledge management in the business press," and Business Intelligence, a British research group, gave him a special award for his outstanding contributions to the field.  He lives in Manhattan.


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