Intellectual property: moral, legal, and international dilemmas

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Rowman & Littlefield, Jun 1, 1997 - Law - 387 pages
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As the expansion of the Internet and the digital formatting of all kinds of creative works move us further into the information age, intellectual property issues have become paramount. Computer programs costing thousands of research dollars are now copied in an instant. People who would recoil at the thought of stealing cars, computers, or VCRs regularly steal software or copy their favorite music from a friend's CD. Since the Web has no national boundaries, these issues are international concerns. The contributors-philosophers, legal theorists, and business scholars, among others-address questions such as: Can abstract ideas be owned? How does the violation of intellectual property rights compare to the violation of physical property rights? Can computer software and other digital information be protected? And how should legal systems accommodate the ownership of intellectual property in an information age? Intellectual Property is a lively examination of these and other issues, and an invaluable resource for librarians, lawyers, businesspeople, and scholars.

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Contents

Part I
7
Justifying Intellectual Property
17
The Moral Foundations of Intangible Property
57
Toward a Lockean Theory of Intellectual Property
81
The Philosophy of Intellectual Property
107
A NonPosnerian Law and Economics
179
Property Monopoly and Intellectual Rights
225
An Unorthodox Analysis
265
The Virtues of Software Ownership
299
Are Computer Hacker Breakins Ethical?
307
National and International Copyright Liability for Electronic
321
Everything You Know about
349
Selected Bibliography
373
Index
379
About the Contributors
385
Copyright

Why Software Should Be Free
283

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About the author (1997)

Moore teaches philosophy at Eastern Michigan University.

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