Intelligence Power in Peace and War

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Cambridge University Press, Oct 13, 1996 - Political Science - 414 pages
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Intelligence services form an important but controversial part of the modern state. Drawing mainly on British and American examples, this book provides an analytic framework for understanding the "intelligence community" and assessing its value. Michael Herman, a former senior British Intelligence officer, describes the various components of intelligence; discusses what intelligence is for; considers issues of accuracy, evaluation and efficiency; and makes recommendations for the future of intelligence in the post-Cold War world.
 

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Contents

V
9
VI
16
VII
36
VIII
59
IX
61
X
82
XI
100
XII
113
XX
221
XXI
240
XXII
257
XXIII
281
XXIV
283
XXV
305
XXVI
322
XXVII
339

XIII
135
XIV
137
XV
156
XVI
165
XVII
183
XVIII
200
XIX
219
XXVIII
341
XXIX
362
XXX
377
XXXI
384
XXXII
395
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