Intentional Interruption: Breaking Down Learning Barriers to Transform Professional Practice

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Corwin Press, Oct 3, 2012 - Education - 104 pages
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We interrupt this program to bring meaningful change to professional learning!

Big ideas can sometimes get stuck on the way to becoming real change. The authors explain the secret to getting unstuck: interrupting the status quo of traditional activity-based professional development to help educators embrace permanent changes in thinking and behavior. You can enable true learning by:

  • Building a focus on learning, collaborative inquiry, and formal and informal instructional leadership in schools
  • Recognizing the psychological processes involved in adult learning, and overcoming the psychological biases and barriers to change 
  • Using tools and strategies such as critical friend relationships, learning conversations, task sheets, and protocols
 

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Contents

FROM ACTIVITY TO LEARNING
1
Why Does Professional Learning Matter So Much?
4
Facilitation as Interruption
8
The Sequence of What Youll Learn in This Book
9
Time for Reflection
11
THE VERY HARD WORK OF LEARNING
13
Learning as a Permanent Change Is Not Easy or Natural
15
Learning as Conceptual Change
18
We Pay Too Much Attention to Things That Are Vivid
59
We Consider Ourselves to Be Exceptions
61
We Hesitate to Take Action in a New Direction
63
We Dont Want Others to See Our Vulnerabilities
64
Coming Together in a Culture of Niceness
66
Time for Reflection
67
INTENTIONAL INTERRUPTION
69
Strategies for Interruption
70

Time for Reflection
22
THE PROBLEM WITH PROFESSIONAL LEARNING
23
The Challenge With Traditional Forms of Professional Development
26
The Challenge With Alternate Forms of Professional Development
28
The Promise of Professional Learning Communities and Why the Challenge Still Exists
30
The Distinction Between Professional Development and Professional Learning
32
Putting Things Together So Far
33
Time for Reflection
34
HOW DO FOCUS COLLABORATIVE INQUIRY AND INSTRUCTIONAL LEADERSHIP ENABLE LEARNING?
35
Collaborative Inquiry That Challenges Thinking and Practice
39
Formal and Informal Instructional Leadership
45
So Whats the Problem?
48
Time for Reflection
49
THE BARRIERS HOW OUR MINDS GET IN THE WAY
51
We Dont Think Through All Possibilities
53
We Focus on Confirming Our Hypotheses Not Challenging Them
56
Using Protocols
71
Making Preconceptions Explicit
74
Ensuring That Activities and Interventions Are Rooted in Problems of Practice
77
Recruiting Contradictory Evidence
78
Viewing Mistakes as Learning Opportunities
82
Encouraging a Growth Rather Than a Fixed Mindset
85
Ensuring That Problems of Practice Are Questions That People Are Curious About
87
Giving People Autonomy in Task and Time
89
Moving Forward
90
The Importance of Knowing AND Doing
91
Dont Wait Start Now
92
Time for Reflection
93
REFERENCES
95
INDEX
101
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About the author (2012)

Steven Katz is a director with the research and evaluation firm Aporia Consulting Ltd. And a permanent faculty member in Human Development and Applied Psychology at OISE, University of Toronto. He is an associate member of the School of Graduate Studies and is the coordinator of teh Psychology of Learning and Develoment initial teacher education program component. Katz has a doctorate in human development and applied sychology, with a specialization in applied cognitive science. His areas of expertise include cognition and learning, teacher education, networked learning communities, and the design of data-driven systems for organizational accountability, planning, and improvement.

Lisa Ain Dack is a senior associate at Aporia Consulting Ltd. and an instructor of Developmental and Educational Psychology in te Initial Teacher Education program throughout the University of Toronto. Lisa has a doctorate in Developmental Psychology and Education from OISE, University of Toronto, with a collaborative degree in Developmental Science.

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