Intergroup Relations: Essential Readings

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Psychology Press, 2001 - Psychology - 439 pages
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Relations between groups, for example those based on race, ethnicity, nationality, gender, age, ability, and socio-economic status, provide the context for everyday life. Intergroup relations frame the way we define ourselves and others, the way we behave, and the way in which we treat and think about others, and how they treat and think about us. Consider how profoundly affected everyday life is by whether relations between groups are harmonious and peaceful, or conflictual and hostile. Not surprisingly, intergroup relations is an exhilarating core topic in social psychology; a topic which connects social psychology with other social sciences, and which challenges social psychology to marshal and to integrate concepts relating to individual cognition, social interaction, and social history. This book is a collection of classic and contemporary readings that help to define the social psychological study of intergroup relations.
 

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Contents

Personality and Individual Differences
15
Personality and Sociocultural Factors in Intergroup Attitudes A CrossNational Comparison
18
Social Dominance Orientation A Personality Variable Predicting Social and Political Attitudes
30
Goal Relations and Interdependence
61
Superordinate Goals in the Reduction of Intergroup Conflict
64
Perceptions of Racial Group Competition Extending Blumers Theory of Group Position to a Multiracial Social Context
71
Social Identity and SelfCatergorization
91
An Integrative Theory of Intergroup Conflict
94
The Social Self On Being the Same and Different at the Same Time
245
Negotiating Social Identity When Contexts Change Maintaining Identification and Responding to Threat
254
Influence in Intergroup Content
267
Knowing What to Think by Knowing Who You Are SelfCategorization and the Nature of Norm formation Conformity and Group Polarization
270
Studies in Social Influence Minority Influence and Conversion Behavior in a Perceptual Task
289
Disadvantage Relative Deprivation and Social Protest
299
The St Pauls Riot An Explanation of the Limits of Crowd Action in Terms of a Social Identity Model
302
Race and Relative Deprivation in the Urban United States
316

Intergroup Relations and Group Solidarity Effects of Group Identification and Social Beliefs on Depersonalized Attraction
110
Intergroup Attitudes and Explanations
129
Social Stereotypes and Social Groups
132
Affirmative Action Unintentional Racial Biases and Intergroup Relations
146
The Ultimate Attribution Error Extending Allports Cognitive Analysis of Prejudice
162
Intergroup Behavior and Discrimination
175
Experiments in Intergroup Discrimination
178
Intergroup Discrimination in Positive and Negative Outcome Allocations Impact of Stimulus Valence Relative Group Status and Relative Group Size
188
Understanding Why the Justice of Group Procedures Matters A Test of the Psychological Dynamics of the GroupValue Model
205
Motives for Group Membership and Intergroup Behavior
229
Comments on the Motivational Status of SelfEsteem in Social Identity and Intergroup Discrimination
232
Responding to Membership in a Disadvantaged Group From Acceptance to Collective Protest
337
Intergroup Contact and Social Harmony
353
Reducing Intergroup Bias the Benefits of Recatergorization
356
Intergroup Contact The Typical Member and the Exception to the Rule
370
Dimensions of Contact as Predictors of Intergroup Anxiety Perceived OutGroup Variability and OutGroup Attitude An Integrative Model
383
References
397
How to Read a Journal Article in Social Psychology
403
Author Index
413
Subject Index
427
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About the author (2001)

MICHAEL A. HOGG is currently Senior Lecturer in Psychology at the University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. He is the author (with Dominic Abrams) of Social Identification, and coeditor of Social Identity Theory and Group Motivation. He is also the author (with Turner, Oakes, Reicher, and Wetherell) of Rediscovering the Social Group.

Dominic Abrams is Professor of Social Psychology and Director of the Centre for the Study of Group Processes at the University of Kent at Canterbury.

Michael A. Hogg is Professor in Social Psychology and Director of the Centre for the Study of Group Processes at the University of Queensland.

Both editors have published widely in the area of group processes and social identity.

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