International Handbook of Jewish Education

Front Cover
Helena Miller, Lisa D. Grant, Alex Pomson
Springer Science & Business Media, Apr 2, 2011 - Religion - 649 pages
1 Review

The International Handbook of Jewish Education, a two volume publication, brings together scholars and practitioners engaged in the field of Jewish Education and its cognate fields world-wide. Their submissions make a significant contribution to our knowledge of the field of Jewish Education as we start the second decade of the 21st century.

The Handbook is divided broadly into four main sections:

  1. Vision and Practice: focusing on issues of philosophy, identity and planning –the big issues of Jewish Education.
  2. Teaching and Learning: focusing on areas of curriculum and engagement
  3. Applications, focusing on the ways that Jewish Education is transmitted in particular contexts, both formal and informal, for children and adults.
  4. Geographical, focusing on historical, demographic, social and other issues that are specific to a region or where an issue or range of issues can be compared and contrasted between two or more locations.

This comprehensive collection of articles providing high quality content, constitutes a difinitive statement on the state of Jewish Education world wide, as well as through a wide variety of lenses and contexts. It is written in a style that is accessible to a global community of academics and professionals.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Academic Jewish Studies in North America
656
The Landscape
669
Congregational Schools
691
Challenges and Opportunities at the Intersection of Two Traditions of Jewish Schooling
713
Day Schools in the Orthodox Sector A Shifting Landscape
729
Early Childhood Education
749
Reaching the Tipping Point
767
Shifting from Evading to EngagingGender Issues and Jewish Adolescents
785

A Case for Guarded Optimism
117
Janush Korczaks Life and Legacy for Jewish Education
143
Educating for Multiple and Moving Targets
163
The Jewish Identity Space and Its Contribution to Research and Practice
182
Who You Knew Affects How You JewThe Impact of Jewish Networks in Childhood upon Adult Jewish Identity
203
Sources and Resources
219
Some Thoughts
236
Toward a New Praxis
247
Pluralism in Jewish Education
267
After Enlightenment Jewish Education and the Paradoxes of Post Modernism
285
The Spiritual Child and Jewish Childhood
301
Visions in Jewish Education
319
Teaching and Learning
334
Educating with Art Without Ruining It
339
Arts and Jewish Day School Education in North America
355
Teaching the Bible in Our Times
373
Jewish Education as if the Planet Mattered
389
What Do We Know and What Can We Hope to Learn from Studying in Havruta?
407
Hebrew Language in Israel and the Diaspora
419
Issues in the Teaching and Learning of Jewish History
441
Holocaust Education
461
Purposes and Practices
479
Israel Travel Education
497
Jewish Peoplehood Education
515
The Power of Tradition Ritual and Transition
541
Other Religions in Jewish Education
560
Making a Case for Talmud PedagogyThe Talmud as an Educational Model
581
The Digital Revolution That Is Shaping TwentyFirstCentury Jewish EducationA Fleeting Snapshot from the First Decade
597
Travel as a Jewish Educational Tool
615
Location Location Location A Practitioners Perspectives on Diaspora Jewish Travel
632
Applications
651
The Decisive Decade How Informal Jewish Education Was Transformed in Its RelationshipINTbreak with Jewish Philanthropy
804
Connection Commitment and Community
825
Learning to Learn The Learning Organisation in Theory and Practice
842
A Unique Model of Transformative Jewish Learning
861
Ideological Encounters Mentoring Teachers in Jewish Education
879
Parents and Jewish Educational Settings
900
Practitioner Enquiry and Its Role in Jewish Education
917
Enduring Issues in Changing Contexts
937
Professional Development of Teachers in Jewish Education
959
Vini Vidi Vici? ShortTerm Jewish Educators Trips to Israel as ProfessionalDevelopment Programs
981
Their Professional Training and Identity Formation
1001
And You Shall Do That Which Is Right and Good Jewish Special Education in North America From Exclusion to Inclusion
1021
Ensuring a Cadre of WellQualified Educational Personnel for Jewish Schools
1041
UltraOrthodoxHaredi Education
1063
Geographical
1081
AmericanJewish Education in an Age of Choice and Pluralism
1086
Day Schools State Funding and Religious Education in State Schools
1105
The Jewel in the Crown of Jewish Education
1125
Jewish Education in Canada
1141
Education of Adult Jewish Leaders in a PanEuropean Perspective
1155
Something from Almost Nothing The Challenges of Education in European Communities A Personal Perspective
1167
Jewish Education
1183
Jewish Education in France
1203
State Religious Education in Israel
1219
Innovations in Secular Schooling in Israel
1235
Challenges Trends and Processes
1253
Netherlands Social Integration and Religious Identity
1271
Author Index
1288
Subject Index
1295
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2011)

Helena Miller is the Director of Research and Evaluation at the UJIA, London. She has a PhD in Jewish Education from London University, and has taught in schools and higher education for many years. Previously, she was the Director of Education at Leo Baeck College, London. She oversees the inspection of Jewish schools in the UK. Publications include “Changing the Landscape: Pluralist Jewish Education in the UK”, Tel Aviv University 2011, “Supplementary Jewish Education in the UK: Facts and Issues of the Cheder System”, International Journal of Jewish Educational Research, February 2010, Accountability through Inspection: Monitoring and Evaluating Jewish Schools London: Board of Deputies of British Jews and Meeting the Challenge: the Jewish Schooling Phenomenon in the UK, The Oxford Review of Education, December 2001, as well as books on teaching visual arts, Craft in Action (Stenor Books 1986) and The Magic Box (Torah Aura 1992). Helena is currently co-chair of Limmud International, on the Advisory Board of the Institute of Jewish Policy Research, and on the executive of the Network for Research in Jewish Education.

Lisa Grant is Associate Professor of Jewish Education at the Hebrew Union College – Jewish Institute of Religion, New York. Her research and teaching focus on adult Jewish learning, the professional development of rabbi-educators, and the place of Israel in American Jewish life. She has published widely in a range of academic journals, books and teaching guides. She is lead author of A Journey of Heart and Mind: Transformational Learning in Adulthood (JTS Press, 2004) with Diane Schuster, Meredith Woocher and Steven M Cohen, and author of Aytz Hayim Hi, a two year curriculum guide for Adult Bat Mitzvah (Women’s League of Conservative Judaism, 2001). Lisa is immediate past chair of the Network for Research in Jewish Education and serves on the executive committee of the Israel Association for Research in Jewish Education. She is currently working on a book on the teaching of Israel in North America.

Alex Pomson is a senior researcher at the Melton Centre for Jewish Education at the Hebrew University, Jerusalem. He trained in History at the university of Cambridge and received his PhD in Religious education from the University of London in 1994. He was founding head of Jewish Studies at King Solomon High School, London. From 1996-2004. He served as Associate professor of Jewish Teacher Education at York University, Toronto, where he co-ordinated York’s Jewish Teacher education Programme. He is past Chair of the Network for Research in Jewish Education. He completed a longitudinal study funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of the Canadian Government, published in 2008, as a co-authored book, Back to School: Jewish day school in the lives of adult Jews. His most recent book, published by the Littman Library of Jewish Civilisation, is a co-edited volume, Jewish schools, Jewish communities: a reconsideration.