International Law: A Treatise, 第 2 卷

封面
Longmans, Green and Company, 1921
0 書評
評論未經驗證,但 Google 會查證並移除遭檢舉的不實內容
 

讀者評論 - 撰寫評論

我們找不到任何評論。

內容

Arbitral Award
32
Award binding upon Parties only
33
The League of Nations and State Differences 256 The League of Nations as a Factor in State Differences
34
25c The Duties of the League itself
35
25e Inquiry by the Assembly
37
25g Disputes in which nonMembers are involved
38
CHAPTER II
39
Compulsive Means in contradistinction to War
40
Compulsive Means in contradistinction to an Ultimatum and De monstrations
41
Retorsion 29 Conception and Character of Rotorsion
42
Retorsion when justified
43
Reprisals 33 Conception of Reprisals in contradistinction to Retorsion
44
Reprisals admissible for all International Delinquencies
45
Reprisals admissible for International Delinquencies only
46
Reprisals by whom performed
47
Objects of Reprisals
48
Positive and Negative Reprisals
49
Reprisals must be proportionate
50
when Reparation is made
51
Reprisals during Peace in contradistinction to Reprisals during War
52
Manner of Pacific Blockade
53
Economic Boycott
61
War a Contention
67
The most important Developments of the Laws of
68
Binding Force of the Laws of War PAQE 84 86 90
69
Region of War in contradistinction to Theatre of
70
Particular Region of every
71
Exclusion from Region of War through Neutralisation
72
Asserted Exclusion of the Baltic Sea from the Region of War 92 93 96 98
73
The Belligerents 74 Qualification to become a Belligerent facultas bellandi
74
War Contention between States
75
Insurgents as a Belligerent Power
76
76a The Case of the CzechoSlovaks 77 Principal and Accessory Belligerent Parties
77
100
84
War Contention between States for the purpose of overpower
92
101
97
Regular Armies and Navies
103
NonCombatant Members of Armed Forces 80 Irregular Forces
105
Levies en masse
106
Barbarous Forces
108
Privateers
109
Converted Merchantmen
112
The Crews of Merchantmen
113
Deserters and Traitors
115
Development of International Law regarding Captivity
125
Relief Societies
131
Civil
136
Moveable Publio Property
137
Other Private Personal Property
143
384
151
104
166
106
167
107
168
109
169
113
171
Enemy Character 87 On Enemy Character in general 88 Enemy Character of Individuals 88a Enemy Character of Corporations 89 Enemy Character ...
173
122
177
124
184
Immunity of Merchantmen at the Outbreak of War on their
188
128
191
130
193
Destruction of Prize
194
133
197
Goods sold to Neutrais in transitie
200
Moveable Private Property in the World
201
74
202
Treatment of the Dead
206
Requisitions and Contributions
207
76
212
Destruction in Marching Reconnoitring and Conducting Trans
213
Espionage and War Treason SECT PAOE 159 Twofold Character of Espionage and War Treason
222
Espionage in contradistinction to Scouting and Despatch 161 Punishment of Espionage 223
223
War Treason
226
79
227
Stratagems in contradistinction to Perfidy
229
Occupation of Enemy Territory 166 Occupation as an Aim of Warfare
230
Occupation when effected
233
Occupation when ended
236
Rights of the Occupant regarding the Inhabitants
238
386
241
Position of Government Officials and Municipal Functionaries during Occupation
242
Position of Courts of Justice during Occupation
243
Rules of Warfare independent of Causes of
246
Lawful and Unlawful Practices of Sea Warfare
247
176
248
Declaration of Paris
250
The Principle of Appropriation of Private Enemy Vessels and Enemy Goods thereon
251
Codification of Law of Sea Warfare
254
Attack and Seizure of Enemy Vessels
255
Importance of Attack and Seizure of Enemy Vessels
256
Attack how effected
258
182a Submarine Contact Mines
259
Duty of giving Quarter
261
Effect of Seizure
262
Immunity of Vessels charged with Religious Scientific or Philanthropic Mission
263
Origin of Geneva Convention
282
Neutrality not practised in Ancient Times
285
Neutrality during the Middle Ages
286
Neutrality during the Soventeenth Century
287
Progress of Neutrality during the Eighteenth Century
288
First Armed Neutrality
289
The French Revolution and the Second Armed Neutrality
290
Neutrality during the Nineteenth Century
291
Neutrality in the Twentieth Century II Characteristics of Neutrality
292
Conception of Neutrality
293
Neutrality an Attitude of Impartiality
294
Neutrality an Attitude creating Rights and Duties
295
Neutrality an Attitude of States
296
No Cossation of Intercourse during Neutrality between Neutrals and Belligerents
297
Noutrality an Attitude during War Neutrality in Civil War
298
Neutrality commences with Knowledge of the
307
Commencement of Neutrality in Civil
308
Establishment of Neutrality by Declarations
309
Municipal Neutrality Laws
310
Abuse of Flag of Truce
311
Competence to conclude Capitulations
317
Partial Armistices
323
ВЕСт
325
Legitimate and Illegitimate Warfare
331
Punishment of War Crimes
341
Supply on the part of Neutrals
349
Supply on the part of Subjects of Neutrals
350
Loans and Subsidies on the part of Neutrals
351
Loans and Subsidies on the part of Subjects of Neutrals 480 481 484 485
352
Pilotage
353
Transport on the part of Neutrals
354
Transport on the part of Neutral Merchantmen and by Private Neutral Rolling Stock
355
Commencement of War in general
356
Violation of Neutrality in the Narrower and in the Wider Sense of the Term
357
Violation in contradistinction to End of Neutrality
358
Consequences of Violations of Neutrality
359
Neutrals not to acquiesco in Violations of Neutrality com mitted by a Belligerent
360
Cases of The General Armstrong and The Dresden
361
Mode of exacting Reparation from Belligerents for Violations
362
Preliminaries of Peace
363
Release of Prisoners of War
370
Justification of Blockade
374
Validity of Legitimate Acts
376
Neutrality
383
Declaration of
393
Carriage of Contraband Penal by the Municipal Law of Belli
398
Requisitions and Contributions upon Coast Towns
400
Negligence on the part of Neutrals
402
End of Neutrality
417
Marauding
420
Contents of Duty of Impartiality
422
the World War
423
Contents of Duty not to suppress Intercourse between Neutrals and the Enemy
424
Neutrals and Military Operations
428
Hostilities by and against Neutrals
429
Furnishing Troops and MenofWar to Belligerents
432
Subjects of Neutrals fighting among Belligerent Forces
433
Passage of Troops and War Material through Neutral Territory
434
Passage of Wounded through Neutral Territory
436
Passage of MenofWar
437
Occupation of Neutral Territory by Belligerents
438
Prize Courts on Neutral Territory
439
Belligerents Prizes in Neutral Ports
440
328a The Case of The Appam
441
Neutrals and Military Preparations
442
Depots and Factories on Neutral Territory
443
Passage of Bodies of Men intending to Enlist
444
Organisation of Hostile Expeditions
445
Building and Fittingout of Vessels intended for Naval Opera tions
451
The Alabama Case and the Three Rules of Washington
453
Neutral Asylum to Land Forces War Material and Airmen 336 On Neutral Asylum in general
456
Neutral Territory and Prisoners of War
457
Fugitive Soldiers and Deserters on Neutral Territory
459
Neutral Territory and Fugitive Troops
460
Neutral Territory and nonCombatant Members of Belligerent Forces
462
34la Neutral Territory and Belligerent Airmen
463
Asylum to Naval Forces in contradistinction to Asylum to Land Forces
464
Neutral Asylum to Naval Forces optional
465
Asylum to Naval Forces in Distress
466
Exterritoriality of MenofWar during Asylum
467
Facilities to MenofWar during Asylum
469
Former Practice of taking Hostages
481
Right of Angary
503
The Original Right of Angary 365 The Modern Right of Angary
505
Right of Angary concerning Neutral Rolling Stock 367 Right of Angary not deriving from Noutrality 503
506
509
509
CHAPTER III
511
Blockade Strategic and Commercial 370 Blockade to be Universal
514
Compensation
523
When Ingress is not considered Breach of Blockade
530
CHAPTER IV
545
Compensation for Violations of the Hague Regulations
546
Absolute and Conditional Contraband and Free Articles
552
Direct Carriage of Contraband
564
Circuitous Carriage of Contraband
566
Indirect Carriage of Contraband Doctrine of Continuous Transports
568
The Case of The Bundesrath
570
Continental Support to the Doctrine of Continuous Transports
571
403a The Declaration of London concerning the Doctrine of Contin uous Voyages and the Practice during the World War
573
404
576
405
578
406
581
406a Seizure of Contraband without Seizure of the Vessel
583
CHAPTER V
585
408
587
409
592
410
593
Unneutral Service creating Enemy Character
594
Consequences of Unneutral Service 411 Capture for Unneutral Service
596
412
597
413
599
413a Seizure of Enemy Reservists during the World War
601
414
604
415
605
417
606
No Universal Rules regarding Mode of Visitation
609
CHAPTER II
634
Blockade Outwards and Inwards 372 What Places can be Blockaded 511
638
Conduct in general of Neutrals and Belligerents 314 What Rights and Duties of Neutrals and of Belligerents there are 419 419
646
515
647
Uncertainty of Rules concerning Interference with Submarine
648
Hostile Destination essential to Contraband
649
Medical Units and Establishments and Material
656
Ultimatum 96 Initiative hostile Acts of War 136 138 140 141
663
Contraband Vessels
666

其他版本 - 查看全部

常見字詞

熱門章節

第 24 頁 - Disputes as to the interpretation of a treaty, as to any question of international law, as to the existence of any fact which if established would constitute a breach of any international obligation, or as to the extent and nature of the reparation to be made for any such breach, are declared to be among those which are generally suitable for submission to arbitration or judicial settlement.
第 38 頁 - If a State so invited shall refuse to accept the obligations of membership in the League for the purposes of such dispute, and shall resort to war against a Member of the League, the provisions of Article 16 shall be applicable as against the State taking such action.
第 454 頁 - First, to use due diligence to prevent the fitting out, arming, or equipping, within its jurisdiction, of any vessel which it has reasonable ground to believe is intended to cruise or to carry on war against a power with which it is at peace...
第 37 頁 - Assembly, if concurred in by the Representatives of those Members of the League represented on the Council and of a majority of the other Members of the League, exclusive in each case of the Representatives of the parties to the dispute...
第 106 頁 - To conduct their operations in accordance with the laws and customs of war. In countries where militia or volunteer corps constitute the army, or form part of it, they are included under the denomination "army.
第 92 頁 - The right of belligerents to adopt means of injuring the enemy is not unlimited.
第 343 頁 - A belligerent is forbidden to force the inhabitants of territory occupied by it to furnish information about the army of the other belligerent or about its means of defence.
第 344 頁 - Convention for the adaptation to maritime warfare of the principles of the Geneva Convention of August 22, 1864.
第 591 頁 - If, to the knowledge of either the owner, the charterer, or the master, she is transporting a military detachment of the enemy, or one or more persons who, in the course of the voyage, directly assist the operations of the enemy.
第 561 頁 - Articles intended for the use of the vessel in which they are found, as well as those intended for the use of her crew and passengers during the voyage.

書目資訊