Interpersonal communication: the social exchange approach

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Sage Publications, Jun 1, 1981 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 151 pages
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A book which examines the social exchange theories of relations between people. These theories tend to view communication as an exchange or extraction of benefit undertaken out of self interest. The book attempts to answer three questions: what are these theories and how do their assumptions differ? How do they view a variety of interpersonal communication phenomena? What are their strengths and weaknesses?

'This highly readable book contributes by abstracting the substance of exchange, then attributing it to the human communication processes.' -- Sociology: Review of New Books, Vol 9 No 3

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Contents

Acknowledgments
7
Social Exchange Theory
33
Relational Development
61
Copyright

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About the author (1981)

MICHAEL E. ROLOFF (Ph.D, Michigan State University) is professor of Communication Studies at Northwestern University. His research and teaching interests are in the general area of interpersonal influence. He has published articles and offers courses focused on persuasion, interpersonal compliance-gaining, conflict management, organizational change and bargaining and negotiation. His current research is focused on conflict avoidance and serial arguing in intimate relationships, the interpretation and construction of persuasive messages, and the effects of planning and alternatives on negotiation processes. He has co-edited four research volumes: (1) Persuasion: New Directions in Theory and Research, (2) Social Cognition and Communication, (3) Interpersonal Processes, and (4) Communication and Negotiation. He wrote Interpersonal Communication: The Social Exchange Approach. He completed a term as the editor of Communication Yearbook and is currently co-editor of Communication Research. He was co-recipient of the Woolbert Award for Outstanding Contribution to Communication Research from the Speech Communication Association and of a publication award from the Social Cognition and Communication Division of the National Communication Association. He has been the Chair of the Interpersonal Communication Division of the National Communication Association. He is currently Director of the National Communication Association Publications Board. Professor Roloff has received several teaching awards from groups at Northwestern including the Associated Student Government, the Mortar Board, and the Alumni Association.

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