Interpreting Ground-penetrating Radar for Archaeology

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Left Coast Press, Nov 15, 2012 - Social Science - 220 pages
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Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) has become one of the standard tools in the archaeologist's array of methods, but users still struggle to understand what the images tell us. In this book—illustrated with over 200 full-color photographs—Lawrence Conyers shows how results of geophysical surveys can test ideas regarding people, history, and cultures, as well as be used to prospect for buried remains. Using 20 years of data from more than 600 GPR surveys in a wide array of settings, Conyers, one of the first archaeological specialists in GPR, provides the consumer of GPR studies with basic information on how the process works. He show how the plots are generated, what subsurface factors influence specific profiles, how the archaeologist can help the surveyor collect optimal data, and how to translate the results into useable archaeological information.
 

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Contents

Preface
13
Acknowledgments
16
Chapter 1 Introduction
17
Chapter 2 Basic Method and Theory of GPR
25
Chapter 3 A Personal History of GPR Interpretation
47
Chapter 4 Geological Complexities
57
Chapter 5 Cultural Complexity
81
Chapter 6 Attenuation and Depth of Penetration
95
Chapter 9 Prehistoric Sites
153
Chapter 10 Caves Tunnels and Void Spaces
171
Chapter 11 Using GPR Interpretations to Understand People
183
Chapter 12 Interpretation in Collaborative Ventures
191
Chapter 13 Conclusion
207
References
209
Index
213
About the Author
220

Chapter 7 Historic Sites
109
Chapter 8 Graves and Cemeteries
129

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About the author (2012)

Lawrence B. Conyers is a professor of anthropology at the University of Denver, Colorado, USA. He received BS and MS degrees in geology and geophysics from Oregon State and Arizona State Universities respectively. His PhD degree is in anthropology from the University of Colorado, Boulder. Before working with ground-penetrating radar in archaeological applications he spent seventeen years in petroleum exploration and development using seismic techniques.

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