Interpretive Reasoning

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Cornell University Press, 2005 - Philosophy - 214 pages
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Laurent Stern here provides a concise account of the difficulties that arise within the interpretive process and in the context of interpretive conflict. Speakers and agents are expected by others to be occasionally insincere. Attempting to be tolerant of alternative interpretations, and dealing with the insincerity of others, often motivates interpreters themselves to become insincere. Accordingly, moral issues emerge for both speakers and interpreters. Interpretive Reasoning discusses such issues in the literature on interpretation.Stern offers a carefully argued account of the very idea of interpretation. What are the constraints on interpretations? What are our grounds for demanding that others agree with our interpretations? How do we support our interpretations? What are the types of interpretations we encounter? How are problems of first-person authority and self-knowledge connected with interpreting? While the author argues for interpretations supported by principles rather than by the consensus of interpreters, he also shows that even well-supported interpretations may be mistaken, and that some interpretive conflicts are interminable. Although this is a book in philosophy, scholars and students in the humanities, the social sciences, and disciplines concerned with interpretive reasoning can read it profitably.
 

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Contents

Natural Interpretation in the Indicative Mood
8
Whereof We May Remain Silent
21
The Contents of Belief Box 1 and the Two Principles
34
Partially Mistaken or Insincere Interpretations
48
Deep Interpretation
50
Weakened Formulation of the Principles
51
Alternatives to the Speakers SelfUnderstanding
52
The FirstPerson Perspective
54
Conciliatory Remarks
123
Understanding and Translating 727
127
Modes of Presentation 733
132
Interpreting 737
133
Paraphrases
139
Deficient Understanding
140
Are Interpretations Intralangnage Translations? 7 Criteria of Adequacy 745
145
Un1versal1zab1l1ty and SelfDecept1on
147

Natural and Deep Interpretations
56
Grandeur and Misery of Deep Interpretation
58
Interpretive Reports
62
The Appeal to the Principles
67
Interpretive Goals
68
Abusing the Principles
69
The Hidden Authoritarianism of Universalizability
73
The Appeal to the Restrictive Principle
76
Can We Adopt a Weaker Form of the Principles?
78
Do Numbers Count in Appealing to a Principle?
80
Interpretive Traditions
83
Universalizability within the Limits of Interpretive Goals
85
Interpretat1ons of Artworks
87
The Fragility of the Intentional Tie
88
Intentionalism and AntiIntentionalism
90
The Interpreters Perspective
91
Levels of Understanding Artworks
93
The Internal versus External Distinction
94
Onand OfftheWall Interpretations
97
Application
101
Blurring Distinctions
102
Art and Life
104
Essent1ally Contestable Interpretat1ons
105
On the Contents of Belief Box 1
106
Interminable Controversies
108
Tolerance no 4 Interminable Controversies and Deep Interpretation
114
Deep or Subjunctive Mood Interpretation
118
Should We Appeal to Principles or to a Consensus?
121
Universalizability
149
Kant 750
150
Interpretive Choices and Aesthetic Judgments
152
Two Kinds of Conflicts
154
Internal Conflicts 755
155
Negotiating Conflicting Judgments
158
Facts and Interpretations 759
159
Objections 767
161
The SelfDeceivers Mistake 763
163
Tainted Interpretations 765
165
Beyond the Pale
167
Relativism
168
Reaching Beyond the Pale 770
170
Psychological Limitations 773
173
The Sincerity Condition 779
179
The Shift of Focus in Interpreting
180
Alternative Interpretive Coals
183
Individual or Social Viewpoints
185
Principles 7
192
Validity of the Principles 797
195
The Voice of Professional Interpreters
198
Consensus among Interpreters 799
199
The Concept of Interpretation
201
Alternatives
205
Preparing the Ground for Others
206
Envoy 277
211
Index
213
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