Intimate Letters from France During America's First Year of War

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Philopolis Press, 1918 - World War, 1914-1918 - 122 pages
 

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Page 5 - School, one of the best known of obstetricians; Dr. Julius Parker Sedgwick, physiological chemist, professor at the University of Minnesota; Dr. John C. Baldwin, specialist in diseases of children; Dr. Clain F. Gelston, Dr. Lucas's assistant at the University of California; Dr. NO Pearce, another specialist, and the following experts in sociology and child welfare work; Mrs. J. Morris Slemons, Mrs.
Page 5 - There is a crying need for effective work among children," cables Major Grayson MP Murphy, head of the American Red Cross Commission now in France. He reports that there is a great need for doctors and nurses for work with mothers and children, and the Infant Welfare Unit will be prepared to give such immediate relief as it can. With Dr. Lucas in the Unit, which was financed by Mrs. William Lowell Putnam of Boston, are Dr. J. Morris Slemons, of the Yale Medical School, one of the best known of obstetricians;...
Page 5 - ... supply quite impracticable. Cooperation with Major Murphy in his plans is pledged by Dr. George W. Crile, of Cleveland, who headed the first Red Cross unit to reach France; Dr. Lambert, Dr. JA Blake, Colonels Ireland and Bradley, of General Pershing's staff, and various American experts on the ground. A group of specialists in infant welfare has been sent to France by the American Red Cross. At its head is Dr. William P. Lucas, professor of pediatrics in the University of California. He reports...
Page 5 - ... the birth rate was officially estimated at only 8 per 1000. In New York State the birth rate is 23 or 24 per 1000, the death rate about 14 per 1000. The total deaths in France in 1916 were about 1,100,000. Births numbered only 312,000. The net loss in population was 788,000 or nearly two per cent, of the whole. In Paris, where 48,917 babies were born in the year ending August 1, 1914, only 26,179 were born in the second year of the war, ending August 1, 1916. "There is a crying need for effective...
Page 6 - ... Baldwin, specialist in diseases of children ; Dr. Clain F. Gelston, Dr. Lucas's assistant at the University of California; Dr. NO Pearce, another specialist, and the following experts in sociology and child-welfare work: Mrs. J. Morris Siemens, Mrs. William P. Lucas, Miss Elizabeth Ashe and Miss Rosamond Gilder, daughter of the poet. These specialists will survey the situation and study the work already being done by the French, and will practice without receiving compensation from patients....
Page 5 - Save a Belgian Baby" movement. Before the war the birth rate and death rate in France were so nearly equal that publicists voiced their concern over the future of the national life. Last year, however, with the death rate probably over 20 per 1000, not counting deaths of men in military service, the birth rate was officially estimated at only 8 per 1000. In New York State the birth rate is 23 or 24 per 1000, the death rate about 14 per 1000. The total deaths in France in 1916 were about 1,100,000....
Page 107 - One boy only died that day. That night eleven more came in from Field 12, all were very bad abdomen and chest cases. The gas boys were all evacuated during the next few days but for a while we had more Americans than they did at the American Hospital. Finally there were about sixty-five wounded left, scattered through all the wards. Miss Wilson went on night duty in the ward with the worst ones.
Page 5 - Last year, however, with the death rate probably over 20 per 1000, not counting deaths of men in military service, the birth rate was officially estimated at only 8 per 1000. In New York State the birth rate is 23 or 24 per 1000, the death rate about 14 per 1000. The total deaths in France in 1916 were about 1,100,000. Births numbered only 312,000. The net loss in population was 788,000 or nearly two per cent, of the whole.
Page 107 - More kept filling in throughout the night. The next day you can easily imagine that we were busy. Miss Wilson had, I think, twenty new gas cases whom she had not only to dress but to wash, besides her old ones and I was running from one place to another interpreting, of course had to work some in the gas ward.
Page 102 - ... was being shelled, and now for three weeks have had nothing to do as that sector has been very quiet. If they are withdrawn, tomorrow the sector may become the center of the conflict, and we would again be unprepared.

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