Intonation and Its Parts: Melody in Spoken English

Front Cover
Stanford University Press, 1986 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 421 pages
1 Review
"It's not what she said, it's the way that she said it," is a complaint we have all heard (or made) some time or another. What does it refer to? It obviously relates to the various forms of wordless communication, but especially to the speaker's use of intonation the rise and fall of the pitch of the voice to convey sarcasm or resignation, anger or apprehension, or any of scores of other moods. In this summation of over forty years of investigation and reflection, the author analyzes the nature, variety and utility of intonation, using some 700 examples from everyday English speech.

The work looks at both accent (pitch shift that points up individual words) and overall configurations (melodies that shape the meaning of whole sentences). It shows that most easily understood utterances employ one or another of a surprisingly small stock of basic melodies, and it shows both intonation and visible gesture to be parts of a larger complex that conveys grammatical as well as emotional information.

Though it is one of the major divisions of the science of linguistics, intonation is of great interest to others outside of linguistics to actors and lawyers who must use the voice to assert, to downplay, or to emote; to English teachers as an essential ingredient of idiomatic speech; to musicians for its many common elements in music theory; and to psychologists and anthropologists as a gauge of emotional tension and a clue to behavior.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

MODULE

Contents

Pitch
3
Tuning the Ear 4 Accent and Intonation 9 Tone Languages
12
Stress Versus Accent 14 Accent as Figure and Ground 15 Vowel Quality
18
Intonation
24
High and Low Pitch 24 Intonation and Grammar 25 Intonation
32
Full and Reduced Vowels 37 Syllable Sequences and Timing 39 Other
43
Interior Accents
50
Forces Opposing Isochrony
70
Profile B 152 Profile CA 155 Profile CB 160 Profiles AC and CAC
161
Uses of Profile C 178 Uses of Profile CA 181 Uses of Profile
191
Cultural Adaptations 197 The Coupling of Intonation and Gesture
199
Syntactic Effects 205 Gradi
213
The Fundamental Pitch and Its Variations 215 Register 216 Binarity
234
The Contradiction Contour 245 Summary of Terms Used to
252
Sandhi 261 Overlap
267
Contours in Particular
274

Accents of Power
74
Informing Versus Impressing 74 Climax 75 Permanent Effects of Cli
86
Interest Information Contrast 89 Wh Words and Focus 95 Deaccent
98
Profiles
139
Profiles as Accent Configurations 139 Profile A 142 Profile C
149
Contours Ending in A 277 Contours Ending in B 306 Contours Ending
332
A Vowel Reduction Derivation and Stress 347 B The Supposed Equiva
361
References 399 Additional Works by the Author
407
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1986)

Dwight Bolinger is Professor Emeritus of Romance Languages and Literatures at Harvard University.

Bibliographic information