Introduction to Counselling Skills: Text and Activities

Front Cover
SAGE, Nov 18, 2008 - Psychology - 320 pages
0 Reviews
'This book is a superb reference for counselling skills trainers and students. It presents practical key skills that are described and discussed clearly and concisely' - Dr Margaret E Smith, Programme Leader, University of Derby

'This Third Edition interestingly adds two relevant sub-themes to its impressive range of subject matter. The text offers a sound, practical and accessible introduction that serves to ground the purpose, application and practice of counselling skills' - Gerry Skelton, Social Work and Counselling educator, trainer and practitioner

Introduction to Counselling Skills, Third Edition is designed to help readers acquire and develop the counselling skills key to effective helping relationships, using an easy-to-follow, three-stage model. Richard Nelson-Jones details each stage in the helping process, using examples to demonstrate counselling skills in a variety of contexts. Showing how skills work in practice and the diversity of issues they can help to address, this book covers:

" what counselling skills are

" improving listening skills

" assessing feelings, thinking and communication

" improving thinking skills and communication skills

" conducting sessions

" ethical issues.

For the Third Edition, Introduction to Counselling Skills has been fully updated, adding new material on relaxation techniques and managing crises. Combining a clear explanation of skills with a host of practical activities, this is the ideal text for introductory courses in counselling skills, counselling and other professional areas including health care, management, education and social work.

Richard Nelson-Jones is a Fellow of the British Psychological Society and of the BACP. He divides his time between London and Chiang Mai, Thailand.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

1 Who are counsellors and helpers?
3
2 Creating communication skills and feelings
11
3 Creating mind skills
19
4 The counselling and helping process
31
5 Counselling and helping relationships
39
PART TWO THE RELATING STAGE
49
6 Understanding the internal frame of reference
51
7 Showing attention and interest
59
speaking demonstrating and rehearsing
153
18 Improving communication and actions
163
19 Improving thinking
173
20 Negotiating homework
185
21Conducting middle sessions
191
22 Terminating counselling and helping
201
PART FIVE FURTHER CONSIDERATIONS
211
23 Relaxation interventions
213

8 Reflecting feelings
67
9 Starting the counselling and helping process
79
10 Managing resistance and making referrals
89
PART THREE THE UNDERSTANDING STAGE
97
11 Assessing feelings and physical reactions
99
12 Assessing thinking
109
13 Assessing communication and actions
121
14 Challenges feedback and selfdisclosure
127
15 Monitoring summarizing and identifying skills
135
PART FOUR THE CHANGING STAGE
145
16 Helping to solve problems
147
24 Managing crises
219
25 Diversity in counselling and helping
225
26 Ethical issues and dilemmas
235
27 Training groups supervision and support
247
28 Counselling theory and research
257
29 Becoming more skilled and human
265
Glossary
277
References
291
Name Index
297
Subject Index
299
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2008)

Richard Nelson-Jones was born in London in 1936. Having spent five years in California as a Second World War refugee, he returned in the 1960s to obtain a Masters and Ph.D from Stanford University. In 1970, he was appointed a lecturer in the Department of Education at the University of Aston to establish a Diploma in Counselling in Educational Settings, which started enrolling students in 1971. During the 1970s, he was helped by having three Fulbright Professors from the United States, each for a year, who both taught students and improved his skills. During this period he broadened out from a predominantly client-centred orientation to becoming much more cognitive-behavioural. He also wrote numerous articles and the first edition of what is now The Theory and Practice of Counselling and Therapy, which was published in 1982. In addition, he chaired the British Psychological Society's Working Party on Counselling and, in1982, became the first chairperson of the BPS Counselling Psychology Section.

In 1984, he took up a position as a counselling and later counselling psychology trainer at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, where he became an Associate Professor. He continued writing research articles, articles on professional issues and books, which were published in London and Sydney. As when he worked at Aston University, he also counselled clients to keep up his skills. In 1997, he retired from RMIT and moved to Chiang Mai in Thailand. There, as well as doing some counselling and teaching, he has continued as an author of counselling and counselling psychology textbooks. A British and Australian citizen, he now divides his time between Chiang Mai and London and regularly visits Australia.

Bibliographic information