Introduction to Criminology: A Text/Reader

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SAGE Publications, Dec 9, 2010 - Social Science - 621 pages
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A unique text/reader that takes a comprehensive, interdisciplinary approach to the study of criminology

Providing an affordable alternative to the standard textbook, this new edition of the authors popular text/reader provides instructors and students the best of both worlds authored text with carefully selected accompanying readings. Now thoroughly updated with new articles, new content, and new statistics, tables, and figures, this Second Edition provides an interdisciplinary perspective on crime and criminality that incorporates the latest theories, concepts, and research from sociology, psychology, genetics, evolutionary biology, and the neurosciences. The new edition is divided into 15 sections that mirror chapters in a typical criminology textbook.

New to This Edition:

  • A new Section 11 on Mass Murder and Terrorism makes coverage of these high-interest topics even more accessible. Section 10 now focuses only on murder, rape, robbery, aggravated assault, and domestic violence, making it easier for students to absorb the material.
  • New articles appear in the structural theories section, the sections devoted to violent crime, and throughout the text/reader as needed.
  • The authors now more closely link sections on types of crime to sections on theory to give readers a more cohesive understanding of the connections between the two.
  • Contemporary criminologists favored theories (drawn from a survey of 770 criminologists) now appear in a table to give readers insight into the professional opinion today on criminological theories.

Features:

  • Each Section has a 15-page introduction (a "mini-chapter ) that contains vignettes, photos, tables and graphs, end-of-chapter questions, and Web exercises, followed by three to four supporting readings.
  • Theory Section introductions contain a unique table that compares and contrasts the theories presented, while theory concluding sub-sections focus on policy and crime prevention.
  • A "How to Read a Research Article" guide (which appears prior to the first reading) illustrates key aspects of a research article.
  • The book s readings are drawn from carefully selected, edited journal articles appropriate for an undergraduate audience.

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About the author (2010)

Anthony Walsh, Professor of Criminology at Boise State University, received his Ph.D. from Bowling Green State University at the ripe old age of 43. He has field experience in law enforcement and corrections. He is the author of over 150 journal articles/book chapters and 34 books, including Biology and Criminology (Routledge, 2009), Feminist Criminology Through a Biosocial Lens (Carolina Academic Press, 2011), Law, Justice, and Society (with Craig Hemmens, Oxford University Press, 2011), Correctional Assessment, Casework, and Counseling (with Mary Stohr, American Correctional Association, 2011), The Neurobiology of Criminal Behavior: Gene-Brain-Culture Interaction (with Jon Bolen, Ashgate, 2012), Corrections: The Essentials (with Mary Stohr, SAGE, 2012), The Science Wars: The Politics of Gender and Race (Transaction, 2013), Criminological Theory: Assessing Philosophical Assumptions (Anderson/Elsevier, 2014), Biosociology: Bridging the Biology-Sociology Divide (Transaction, 2014), Criminology: The Essentials (Sage, 2015). His interests include the biosocial criminology, statistics, and criminal justice assessment and counseling.

Craig Hemmens is Department Chair and Professor in the Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology at Washington State University. In addition to being the editor for the SAGE Text/Reader Series in Criminology/Criminal Justice, he has published several books, including Law, Justice and Society (Oxford University Press, 2012), Legal Guide for Police (Anderson, 2011) and An Introduction to Criminal Evidence (Oxford University Press, 2009). He holds a J.D. from North Carolina Central University School of Law and a Ph.D. in Criminal Justice from Sam Houston State University. He served as the President of the Association of Criminal Justice Sciences (ACJS) from 2012 to 2013.

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