Introduction to Environmental Toxicology: Impacts of Chemicals Upon Ecological Systems, Third Edition

Front Cover
CRC Press, Dec 29, 2003 - Science - 512 pages
The rapidly evolving field of environmental toxicology involves the study of toxic compounds and their effect on living organisms, as well as their fate within the natural environment. Since publication of the first edition, Introduction to Environmental Toxicology has found a secure place among the major texts and references in this field.

Introduction to Environmental Toxicology, Third Edition seamlessly covers processes and impacts from the molecular level all the way up to population levels. While retaining the strengths of previous editions, the third edition includes a new chapter on fluoride, an update on endocrine disruption, a discussion of the use of models to reconstruct concentration-response curves, expansion of the metals chapter, and new developments in ecological risk assessment for management decisions at site to regional scales. It is an ideal text for introducing students to the fields of ecotoxicology and risk assessment.
 

Contents

Introduction to Environmental Toxicology
8
3
8
An Introduction to Toxicity Testing
11
References
14
References and Suggested Readings 28 225
28
3
42
5
49
The Design of Multispecies Toxicity Tests
60
References and Suggested Readings
231
References and Suggested Readings
268
50
272
Measuring and Predicting the Responses
275
Investigate Toxicant Effects
315
53
337
65
348
66
351

7
66
Summary
102
5
115
Summary of Design Guidelines for Multispecies
155
References and Suggested Readings
179
References and Suggested Readings
200
References and Suggested Readings
215
Study Questions
356
References and Suggested Readings
398
1
408
Appendix B Framework for Ecological Risk Assessment
419
Index
469
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 404 - Ecological risk assessment is a process that evaluates the likelihood that adverse ecological effects may occur or are occurring as a result of exposure to one or more stressors [1].

Bibliographic information