Introduction to e-commerce

Front Cover
McGraw-Hill Irwin MarketspaceU, Aug 8, 2003 - Business & Economics - 516 pages
Introduction to E-Commerce, 2/e, by Rayport and Jaworksi, can be used as the principles book for e-commerce. Much like there is a "Principles of Marketing" that is intended to be the first course in marketing, The text covers the entire landscape of e-commerce. The key message is that faculty who want to teach an introductory class on e-commerce and focus on the "strategy" parts of e-commerce first and technology second, should adopt this book. Faculty who teach marketing, management, strategy and entrepreneurship as the "core" discipline prefer this book over "technology-oriented" e-commerce books. Introduction to e-Commerce gives present and future practitioners of e-Commerce a solid foundation in all aspects of conducting business in the networked economy. The text focus is on what a manager needs to know about Internet infrastructure, strategy formulation and implementation, technology concepts, public policy issues, and capital infrastructure in order to make effective business decisions. This is presented in a framework for the study and practice of e-Commerce with business strategy at the core surrounded by four infrastructures; the technology infrastructure that underlies the Internet, the media infrastructure that provides the content for businesses, public policy regulations that provide both opportunities and constraints, and the capital infrastructure that provides the money and capital to run the businesses. Within this framework, the authors provide a deep exploration of core concepts of online strategy and associated enablers enriched by a wide variety of examples, case studies, and explanations culled directly from practice.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Framework for eCommerce 1
The Framework for the Field
Contents
Copyright

39 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2003)

Rayport is an associate professor of business administration in the Service Management Unit at the Harvard Business School.

Bibliographic information