Introduction to General Chemistry

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McGraw-Hill book Company, Incorporated, 1920 - Chemistry - 648 pages
 

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Page 114 - Avogadro's law states that equal volumes of all gases at the same temperature and pressure contain the same number of molecules...
Page 561 - Mendeleeff, which states that the properties of the elements are periodic functions of their atomic weights.
Page 515 - Pa Ra Rn Re Rh Rb Ru Sm Sc Se Si Ag Na Sr S Ta Te Tb Tl Th Tm Sn Ti W U V Xe Yb Y Zn Zr...
Page 515 - Al Sb A As • Ba Bi B Br Cd Cs Ca C Ce Cl Cr Co Cb Cu...
Page 111 - Newton's three laws: a body at rest remains at rest, and a body in motion remains in uniform motion in a straight line unless acted upon by an external force...
Page 241 - The quantities of different elements or groups of elements liberated by the same quantity of electricity are proportional to their equivalent weights.
Page 534 - The alloy of iron and nickel known as "invar" is called a steel. Invar containing 36 per cent of nickel is practically without expansion or contraction when exposed to varying temperatures. It is used for scientific instruments, pendulums, and steel tapes. An alloy of 25 per cent nickel and 75 per cent copper is used in the 5-cent piece or " nickel
Page 543 - ... class have much in common, and we might therefore expect the physical as well as the chemical properties of the atoms to have a general resemblance to each other. This property is, I think, analogous to that indicated by the periodic law in chemistry. We know that if we arrange the elements in the order of their atomic weights, then, as we proceed in the direction of increasing atomic weight, we come across an element, say lithium, with a certain property ; we go on and after passing many elements...
Page 69 - In scientific work in all countries, the unit quantity of heat is the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 g. of water 1 C.
Page 101 - If any solution of unknown nature gives with hydrochloric acid a white precipitate which is insoluble in an excess of the acid...

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