Inventing Human Rights: A History

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W. W. Norton & Company, Apr 17, 2008 - Political Science - 272 pages
3 Reviews

“A tour de force.”—Gordon S. Wood, New York Times Book Review

How were human rights invented, and how does their tumultuous history influence their perception and our ability to protect them today? From Professor Lynn Hunt comes this extraordinary cultural and intellectual history, which traces the roots of human rights to the rejection of torture as a means for finding the truth. She demonstrates how ideas of human relationships portrayed in novels and art helped spread these new ideals and how human rights continue to be contested today.
 

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User Review  - dono421846 - LibraryThing

The first half of the book, which is full of intriguing ideas, deep research and on-point examples, deserves at least 4 stars. The second half, however, is much weaker, and while still interesting ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - bakabaka84 - LibraryThing

An interesting little book about the evolution of human rights from he 1700's to today. At the beginning of the book Hunt asks an interesting question if human rights are "self evident" such as many ... Read full review

Contents

Acknowledgments
11
TORRENTS OF EMOTION
35
BONE OF THEIR BONE
70
THEY HAVE SET A GREAT EXAMPLE
113
THERE WILL BE NO END OF IT
146
THE SOFT POWER OF HUMANITY
176
Three Declarations 1776 1789 1948
215
Notes
230
Permissions
261
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Lynn Hunt is Distinguished Research Professor at UCLA, former president of the American Historical Association, and author of numerous works, including Inventing Human Rights and Telling the Truth about History. She lives in Los Angeles.

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