Inventing the American Presidency

Front Cover
Thomas E. Cronin
University Press of Kansas, 1989 - Biography & Autobiography - 404 pages
Inventing the American Presidency--in fourteen essays supplemented by relevant sections of and Amendments to the Constitution and five Federalist essays by Hamilton--provide the reader with the essential historical and political analyses of who and what shaped the presidency. What was decided in Philadelphia in 1787 and why? Why have a presidency? Who could be elected? How? For how long a tenure? With what responsibilities and powers? What were key debates during the founding period, and what questions have endured? For students of the American presidency, these essays will be must reading. "Edited by an influential presidential scholar, this collection marks the bicentennial of the office of the presidency. It brings together a wealth of information and insights on the construction of the nation's highest office."--Jeffrey K. Tulis, author of The Rhetorical Presidency and coeditor of The Presidency in the Constitutional Order.

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User Review  - LisaMaria_C - LibraryThing

This was one of the basic texts assigned to me in a college class on the American presidency. It's a collection of essays by various scholars, including Cronin, on the structure, powers and precedents ... Read full review

Contents

Relevant Sections of and Amendments to the Constitution
1
Qualifications for President
13
Designing the Electoral College
33
Copyright

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About the author (1989)

Thomas E. Cronin is the McHugh Professor of American Institutions and Leadership at Colorado College. He is president emeritus of Whitman College (1993 2005) and a former acting president of Colorado College (1991). He earned a Ph.D. in political science from Stanford University, and is author, coauthor, or editor of a dozen books on politics and government. Cronin is a past president of both the Western Political Science Association and the Presidency Research Group and was honored by the American Political Science Association with the Charles E. Merriam Award recognizing outstanding contributions to the art of government.

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