Inventory of Seeds and Plants Imported

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1918 - Germplasm resources, Plant
 

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Page 67 - Last spring their planting exceeded by 12,000,000 acres the largest planting of any previous year, and the yields from the crops were record-breaking yields. In the fall of 1917 a wheat acreage of 42,170,000 was planted, which was 1,000,000 larger than for any preceding year, 3,000,000 greater than the next largest, and 7,000,000 greater than the preceding five-year average. But I ought to say to you that it is not only necessary that these achievements should be repeated, but that they s'hould be...
Page 50 - The crows ((jorvus kubaryi) are very fond of them, and the natives eat them as delicacies either fresh or candied. The bark and leaves are astringent and contain tannin. In India they are mixed with iron salts to form a black pigment, with which the natives in certain localities color their teeth and make ink. This species is an excellent shade tree. It is of wide tropical distribution and is often planted for ornament and for the sake of its nuts. It has been introduced into Hawaii and the natives...
Page 31 - The seeds are eaten by the blacks after cooking, as they are poisonous in the raw state. Some shipwrecked sailors in northwestern Australia were poisoned by them.
Page 67 - The farmers of this country are as efficient as any other farmers in the world. They do not produce more per acre than the farmers in Europe. It is not necessary that they should do so. It would perhaps be bad economy for them to attempt it. But they do produce by two to three or four times more per man. per unit of labor and capital, than the farmers of any European country. They are more alert and use more labor-saving devices than any other farmers in the world . And their response to the demands...
Page 67 - But they do produce by two to three or four times more per man, per unit of labor and capital, than the farmers of any European country. They are more alert and use more labor-saving devices than any other farmers in the world. And their response to the demands of the present emergency has been in every way remarkable. Last spring their planting exceeded by 12,000,000 acres the largest planting of any previous year, and the yields from the crops were record-breaking yields. In the fall of 1917 a...
Page 50 - A large, quick-growing, symmetrical tree, with a spreading top and fine graceful feathery foliage, indigenous to Ceylon and Malaya. The young leaves and shoots are covered with a brown velvet tomentum, from which the tree takes its specific name. The tree flowers twice a year at irregular seasons, some specimens being in blossom while others by its side are in ripe fruit. The flowers are rusty yellow, sweet scented, and borne in large erect panicles. Trirnen, in his Flora of Ceylon, stated : ' It...
Page 38 - The mountain tree, which has lately been distinguished here as var. monticola, grows as a tree from the time the seed germinates, and the seedlings show no variation of habit. Young trees are clean stemmed with short branches which form a narrow pyramidal head. The leaves are of rather different shape and less hairy than those of the lowland tree; the flowers are fully a third larger and the fruit is nearly twice as large. Trees less than 10 feet produce flowers and fruit in abundance.
Page 60 - They are mostly eaten raw, but are also sliced and shredded in soups, and in meat find fish dishes. Foreigners in China grate them and serve them boiled as a winter vegetable, in which state they very much resemble sweet corn in looks and taste. The plants need a Lot summer to mature and are grown on a muck or clayey soil with several inches of standing water on top, in very much the same manner as wet-land rice.
Page 48 - It likes a deep moist, loamy soil, and thrives wTell on calcareous formations. In some parts of the north of England, on the east side of the Plain of York, for instance, It is a common hedgerow tree, almost as common as the elm is in the south.
Page 31 - ... inches wide, with narrow-pointed fringed lobes 1 inch long; nuts one-half to five-eighths of an inch in diameter. (Adapted from WJ Bean, Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles, vol. 1, p.

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