Invisible Labor: Hidden Work in the Contemporary World

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Univ of California Press, Jun 28, 2016 - Business & Economics - 336 pages
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Across the world, workers labor without pay for the benefit of profitable businesses—and it's legal. Labor trends like outsourcing and technology hide some workers, and branding and employer mandates erase others. Invisible workers who remain under-protected by wage laws include retail workers who function as walking billboards and take payment in clothing discounts or prestige; waitstaff at “breastaurants” who conform their bodies to a business model; and inventory stockers at grocery stores who go hungry to complete their shifts. Invisible Labor gathers essays by prominent sociologists and legal scholars to illuminate how and why such labor has been hidden from view.
 

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Contents

Conceptualizing Invisible Labor
3
The Conceptual
28
Maintaining Hierarchies in Predominantly White
47
Virtual Work and Invisible Labor
71
Opposing
87
Disability Segregation and Work
115
Race Politics and Invisibility
130
Surveillance Hunger
148
The Invisible Consequences of Aesthetic Labor
193
The Impact
214
SelfBranding among Freelance Knowledge Workers
239
Consuming Work
257
Conclusion
279
About the Editors and Contributors
293
Index
299
Copyright

The Aesthetic Labor
171

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About the author (2016)

Marion G. Crain is Vice Provost, Wiley B. Rutledge Professor of Law, and Director for the Center for the Interdisciplinary Study of Work and Social Capital at Washington University. 

Miriam A. Cherry is Professor of Law at Saint Louis University. 

Winifred R. Poster is a Stanford-trained sociologist affiliated with Washington University.

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