Invitation to Computer Science: C++ Version

Front Cover
Thomson Course Technology, 2004 - Computers - 672 pages
In this best-selling text, Mike Schneider and Judy Gersting unify and lend relevance to the topics of computer science within their proven framework of a six-layer hierarchy of abstractions. The authors begin by showing that computer science is the study of algorithms, which is the central theme of the book, then move up the next five levels of the hierarchy: hardware, virtual machine, software, applications, and ethics. Each layer in the hierarchy builds upon the ideas and concepts presented in earlier chapters. In addition to some motivational applications such as Web page design and interactive graphics, the book covers the fundamental issues of algorithms, hardware design, computer organization, system software, language models, theory of computation, and social and ethical issues of computing. Exposure to these deeper and more complex core ideas introduces students to the richness and beauty of the field and helps them appreciate the principles behind their creation and implementation. While feeling the excitement of computer science, students receive a solid grounding in the central concepts as well as in important uses of computing and information technology.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

An Introduction to Computer Science
2
Chapter
3
In the Beginning
9
Copyright

46 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2004)

G. Michael Schneider is Professor Emeritus of Mathematics and Computer Science at Macalester College in St. Paul, Minnesota. He also served as a Visiting Professor of Computer Science at Columbia University in New York. His professional interests include parallel processing, computer networks, programming methodology, and computer science education. He has written many successful textbooks on software development, data structures, computer organization, and a breadth-first overview of computer science. Dr. Schneider was a member of the committee that authored the ACM/IEEE Computing Curriculum 2001. He has received Fulbright Grants to teach computer science and applied mathematics in Mauritius, Malaysia, Nepal, and Mongolia. He received his B.S. from Michigan University and his M.Sc. and Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Bibliographic information