Iphigenia in Tauris,: A Tragedy,

Front Cover
Printed at the Norfolk Press by J. Crouse and W. Stevenson. For J. Johnson, St. Paul's Curch-Yard, 1793
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 12 - Who prizes his own deeds is justly blam'd. ARKAS. He too who undervalues real worth No less than he who overrates demerit. Hear me, and trust the counsel of a man, Who loves thee with sincere and honest zeal : To-day, when Thoas shall address thee, priestess, 0 listen to his prayer ! IPHIG. Thou grievest me. 1 oft have studied to avoid his offers. ARKAS. Calmly compare thy conduct with thy duty. Since worthy Thoas lost his only son, He trusts but few among us, and these few Far less than heretofore....
Page 123 - A golden fleece, or horses, or fair daughters ; But force and cunning have not always led them In safety home with their ill-gotten wealth. OREST. The statue will not be a cause of quarrel. We now perceive the error, which the god Hung o'er our clouded eyes, while hitherward He suffer'd us to bend our dangerous course. When I besought his counsel and assistance To banish the Eumenides, he answer'd : " When thy pious hand from Tauris The unwilling inmate brings Of the ancient sanctuary, And the sister...
Page 73 - Our race — like dragons in the sulphur -pool, born of one mother — tear each others entrails — Childless and guiltless come along with me. Thou lookst with pity on me — look not so — such were the eyes thy mother turn'd upon me to seek an entrance to my filial heart, when I had heav'd, my hand to pierce her bosom : and yet the dagger pierc'd her. — Mother, come, and place a troop of furies round thy children: they'll have a welcome sight to smile upon, the last, most horrible, that shall...
Page 53 - PYLA. With harshness, which if aught might plead for murder Would lessen the atrociousness of this. He had allur'd the queen to come to Aulis, There seiz'd her first-born dear Iphigeneia, And stain'd the altar with a daughter's blood ; Because the gods denied a prosperous wind. Hence sprang the hate, that to ^Egisthus' tongue Unlock'd her easy bosom, and induc'd her To weave this woof of mischief for her husband.
Page 119 - And place the best of them against me here. Far as the endless earth produces heroes This prayer to no stranger is denied. THOAS. Our ancient customs have preserv'd no trace Of such a privilege. OREST. From thee and me Then let this novel usage take its date: An imitating people soon shall hallow...
Page 17 - ... contented if the people praise me. What I have won glads others more than me. He is the happiest, whether king or subject, Beneath whose roof domestic joy resides. Thou wast a partner of my bitter grief When by my side the sword of hostile war Stretch'd with the dead my last my best of sons. Long as my spirit brooded hot revenge I did not feel how void my dwelling was; But now, that I return with satiate soul, Have offer'd up a nation to his manes, I meet no comfort in my silent home. Now from...
Page 54 - It see me yet again. [goes. PYLA. She seems affected deeply by the fate Of Agamemnon. Whosoe'er she be, She must have known him well, and have belong'd To some high family before her capture And sale to these barbarians. Now, my heart, A twinkling star of hope is risen anew, And we may steer our course with growing spirit. ACT III. IPHIGENEIA and ORESTES. IPHIG. unbinding him. Unhappy man, I only loose thy bonds In sign of harder fate : the freedom, granted Here in the holy grove to both of you,...
Page 72 - Brother, command thyself, and know me better: Nor take a sister's transports (heaven approves them) For hasty punishable headlong lust. Ye gods, remove illusion from his eye, Least this bright instant of the utmost joy Should make us trebly wretched. I am she, Thy long-lost sister. Trembling from the altar Diana bore me to her temple here. Thou art the destin'd victim now, and findest A sister in the priestess.
Page 64 - I cannot bear that thy pure spotless soul Should be misled by falsehood. Let the stranger Weave his deceitful and insnaring wiles For them he fears ; but, between us, be truth. I am Orestes : and this guilty head Is stooping to the tomb, is seeking death — In any form his coming shall be welcome. Whoe'er thou be, to thee and to my friend I wish deliverence, to myself destruction.
Page 27 - How may I venture on this impious step? Has not the goddess, who protected me, alone a right to my devoted head? She sought me an asylum, she preserves me. perchance to soothe an aged father's cares, whom my apparent loss enough has punisht. Perchance my glad return is now approaching : and shall I, mindless of the ways of heaven, bind myself here without Diana's sanction? Was I to stay I ask'da signal of her - THOAS. That signal is that thou art still detain'd. Seek not so many vain pretences, maid:...

Bibliographic information