Iran: Between Tradition and Modernity

Front Cover
Ramin Jahanbegloo
Lexington Books, 2004 - History - 216 pages
The Iranian Revolution represented to intellectuals and professionals the potential of spiritual values to triumph over the great power of economic imperialism. Yet out of this revolution has emerged an identity crisis that touches Islamic ideological heights and reaches down to the very ground of Islamic practice. The contributors to this collection, experts on Iranian cultural and political history, analyze the 'fragmented self' of today's Iranian, refracted through that country's institutions, market forces, and modern thought. Each essay both deepens our understanding of contemporary Iran and adds to the broader discussion of the relationship between Islam and the West.
 

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Contents

Iranian Society Modernity and Globalization
3
Keywords in Islamic Critiques of Technoscience Iranian Postrevolutionary Interpretations
15
The Relevance of John Locke to Social Change in the Muslim World A Comparison with Iran
25
THEOLOGY AND MODERNITY
37
Negotiating Modernity Ulama and the Discourse of Modernity in NineteethCentury Iran
39
Mehdi Haeri Yazdi and the Discourse of Modernity
51
Utopia of Assassins Navvab Safavi and the Fadaian Eslam in Prerevolutionary Iran
71
INTELLECTUAL DISCOURSES OF MODERNITY
93
The Varieties of Religious Reform Public Intelligentsia in Iran
117
The Homeless Texts of Persianate Modernity
129
MODERNIZATION GENDER AND POLITICAL CULTURE
159
Womens Employment in Iran Modernization and Islamization
161
Islamist Women Activists Allies or Enemies?
169
Power and Purity Iranian Political Culture Communication and Identity
185
Index
207
About the Editor and Contributors
215

Blindness and Insight The Predicament of a Muslim Intellectual
95

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About the author (2004)

Ramin Jahanbegloo is head of the Department for Contemporary Thought at the Cultural Research Bureau, Iran, and assistant professor at Aga Khan University's Institute for the Study of Muslim Civilizations, London.

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