Ireland, 1494-1603

Front Cover
Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, 1920 - Ireland - 30 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 13 - Parliament under the great seal of England, had and obtained. That done, a Parliament to be had and holden after the form and effect afore rehearsed, and if any Parliament be holden in that land hereafter contrary to the form and provisions aforesaid, it be deemed void and of none effect in law5.
Page 18 - Some say that the prelates of the church and clergy is much cause of all the misorder of the land ; for there is no archbishop ne bishop, abbot ne prior, parson ne vicar, ne any other person of the church, high or low, great or small, English or Irish, that useth to preach the word of God, saving the poor friars beggars.
Page 18 - As might be expected, the Church was in a deplorable condition. " The noble folk of Ireland oppress and spoil the prelates of the Church of Christ of their possessions and liberties ; and therefore they have no fortune, no grace, no prosperity of body or soul." The prelates and clergy, however, were themselves greatly to blame, " for there is no archbishop, no bishop, abbot, no prior, parson, no vicar, nor any other person of the Church, high or low, great or small, English or Irish, that useth to...
Page 13 - Acts as to them seemeth should pass in the same Parliament, and such causes, considerations, and Acts affirmed by the King and his Council to be good and expedient for that land, and his license thereupon, as well in affirmation of the said causes and Acts as to summon the said Parliament under the great seal of England, had and obtained.
Page 15 - England and returned under the great seal, yet " as many events and occasions may happen within the time of the Parliament, the which may be thought meet and necessary to be provided for, and yet at or before the time of the summoning of Parliament was not thought or agreed upon...
Page 16 - Act to safeguard the Crown from reckless legislation. ' Whereas,' she wrote, ' we understand you are desirous to have authority to call a Parliament, the rather for the receiving of our subsidy there . . . before we assented thereunto we could have been contented to have had advertisement from you what other matters you thought most meet to be commended in the same for the benefit of our service. For, except the same might appear very necessary, we have small disposition to assent to any Parliament....
Page 17 - Poynings' time before the same bill be first agreed on in a ' session of a Parliament holden in this realm by the greater ' number of the lords and commons.
Page 15 - Act of 3 and 4 Phil, and Mary, cap. 4, and the other of II Eliz. Ses. 3, cap. 8, explain this act further, and the latter points out the reason for the original enactment, namely, that "before this statute, when liberty was given to the governors to call parliaments at their pleasure, acts passed as well to the dishonour of the prince, as to the hindrance of their subjects" (" Irish Statutes,
Page 13 - ... them seemeth should pass in the same parliament, and such causes, considerations, and acts, affirmed by the king and his council to be good and expedient for that land, and his licence thereupon, as well in affirmation of the said causes and acts...
Page 4 - The Lord Deputy of Ireland sat under the cloth of estate in his robes of crimson velvet, representing the Queen's Majesty's most royal person. Item, Robert Weston, doctor of laws, and Dean of the Cathedral Church of St. Patricks Dublin, Lord Chancellor of Ireland, sat on the right of the said Lord Deputy. Item Thomas Butler, Earl of Ormond and Ossory, Viscount Thurles, High Treasurer of Ireland, sat on the left of the said Lord Deputy. Memorandum that these two lords sat severally above by themselves,...

Bibliographic information