Irish Folk-history Plays

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G. P. Putnam's sons, 1923
 

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Page 200 - OH, where, Kincora! is Brian the Great? And where is the beauty that once was thine ? Oh, where are the princes and nobles that sate At the feast in thy halls, and drank the red wine? Where, oh, Kincora?
Page 61 - All the wide earth to come between Diarmuid and myself, it would put us no farther away from one another than what we are. And as for the love I had for him, it is dead now, and turned to be as cold as the snow is out beyond the path of the sun. Finn: It is the trouble of the day that is preying on you. Grania: He had no love for me at any time. It is easy know it now. I knew it all the while, but I would not give in to believe it. His desire was all the time with you yourself and Almhuin. He let...
Page 31 - ... all our time upon the road. Are you not better pleased now than when we dragged lonely-hearted and sore-footed through the days ? GRANIA. I am better pleased, surely — and it is by reason of that I would wish my happiness to be seen, and not to be hidden under the branches and twigs of trees. ... It is not my mind that changes, it is life that changes about me. If I was content to be in hiding a while ago, now I am proud and have a right to be proud. And it is hard to nourish pride in a house...
Page 186 - Do not be afraid to give back my gifts, do not separate yourself from your companions for my sake. For there is little of my life but is spent, and there has come upon me this day all the pain of the world and its anguish, seeing and knowing that a deed once done has no undoing, and the lasting trouble my unfaithfulness has brought upon you and your children for ever. (Mamie lays down her necklace and goes away sadly.) There is kindness in your unkindness...
Page 200 - Mac Liag, and my home is on the Lake; Thither often, to that palace whose beauty is fled Came Brian to ask me, and I went for his sake Oh, my grief! that I should live, and Brian be dead! Dead, oh, Kincora!
Page 186 - Do not be afraid to give back my gifts,' says Dervorgilla to the last of them, 'do not separate yourself from your companions for my sake. For there is little of my life but is spent, and there has come upon me this day all the pain of the world and its anguish, seeing and knowing that a deed once done has no undoing, and the lasting trouble my unfaithfulness has brought upon you and your children for ever.
Page 205 - Dervorgilla, daughter of the King of Meath, wife of O'Rourke, King of Breffny, was taken away, willingly or unwillingly, by Diarmuid MacMurrough, King of Leinster, in the year 1152. O'Rourke and his friends invaded Leinster in revenge, and in the wars which followed, Diarmuid, driven from Ireland, appealed for help to Henry II of England, and was given an army under Strongbow, to whom Diarmuid promised Leinster as reward.
Page 38 - ... Grania by Finn MacCool, to whom Grania had been betrothed. .When Finn, disguised as a blind beggar, visits the lovers in their tent, Grania, who does not recognize him, bids him give Finn this message from her : — Give heed to what I say now. If you have one eye is blind, let it be turned to the place where we are, and that he might ask news of. And if you have one seeing eye, cast it upon me, and tell Finn you saw a woman no way sad or afraid, but as airy and high-minded as a mountain-filly...
Page 7 - And one that climbed to his darling's window by one golden thread of her hair. Finn: There are many such tales and there are more in the making, for it is likely the tearing and vexing of love will be known so long as men are hot-blooded and women have a coaxing way. Grania: I asked the old people what love was, and they gave me no good news of it at all. Three sharp blasts of the wind they said it was, a white blast of delight and a grey blast of discontent and a third blast of jealousy that is...

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