Irish Impressions

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W. Collins, 1920 - Ireland - 243 pages
 

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Page 241 - IN his new novel, Mr Mills Whitham, while developing his realistic art, leaves sombre tragedy for picaresque comedy. The tale carries the girl Zillah through early years in a North Devon hamlet; adventures on Exmoor...
Page 242 - MARMADUKE PICKTHALL Author of Knights of Araby, etc. A NOVEL of the plenteous days before the war. The author has essayed the high imaginative task of investing the established order with the mantle of romance. It is not the mantle of Don Quixote nor of Tartarin de Tarascon : but it is the best and gayest cloak of humour which the author could devise consistently with the sentiments of awe and reverence with which he naturally approached the subject. Extra Crown 8vo.
Page 198 - He can only see it, smell it, hear it, handle it, bump into it, fall over it, kill it, be killed for it, or be damned for doing it wrong. He must be content with these mere hints of its existence; but he cannot define it, because it is like a person, and no book of logic will undertake to define Aunt Jane or Uncle William. We can only say, with more or less mournful conviction, that if Aunt Jane is not a person, there is no such thing as a person. And I say with equal conviction that if Ireland is...
Page 236 - ... the world. A chance shred of sunshine rested, like a riven banner, on the hill which I believe is called in Irish the Mountain of the Golden Spears; and I could have imagined that the spears and the banner were coming on. And in that flash I remembered that the men of this island had once gone forth, not with the torches of conquerors or destroyers, but as missionaries in the very midnight of the Dark Ages; like a multitude of moving candles, that were the light of the world.
Page 239 - SAME AUTHOR A WRITER'S RECOLLECTIONS Demy Svo. 12s. &d. net. The Young Physician FRANCIS BRETT YOUNG Author of Marching on Tanga, etc. The Young Physician is the history of the formative years of a boy who, after leaving one of our public schools, decides more from force of circumstances than from inclination to enter the medical profession. Sidelight is thrown upon our educational system in the first part of the book, which is devoted to home and school life; while in the second, the impressions...
Page 241 - ... recorded, of a great and beautiful love, which knew how to survive even the hot searing iron of war. The main action of the book is laid in Manchester, and gives an attractive picture of journalistic life and the coulisses of a Repertory theatre. Extra Crown 8vo. 7s. net. Full Circle MARY AGNES HAMILTON PLACED first in Scotland and later in London, and timed more than a dozen years before the war, this story follows the intertwined fortunes of a brother and sister, members of a singularly happy,...
Page 62 - The Paradox of Labour MY first general and visual impression of the green island was that it was not green but brown; that it was positively brown with khaki. This is one of those experiences that cannot be confused with expectations; the sort of small thing that is seen but not foreseen in the verbal visions of books and newspapers. I knew, of course, that we had a garrison in Dublin, but I had no notion that it was so obvious all over Dublin. I had no notion that it had been considered necessary...
Page 116 - Jews would be ill-advised if they actually crowned him with thorns, and killed him on a hill just outside Jerusalem. Now we must know by this time, or the sooner we know it the better, that the whole mind of that European society which we have helped to save, and in which we have henceforth a part right of control, regards the Anglo-Irish story as one of those black and white stories in a history book. It sees the tragedy of Ireland as simply and clearly as the tragedy of Christ or Joan of Arc. There...
Page 145 - English writers, when they wrote about Irish patriots, could see nothing but a very small joke in modern rebels thinking themselves worthy to take the titles of antique kings. But the only doubt I should have, if I had any, is whether the heathen kings were worthy of the Christian rebels. I am much more sure of the heroism of the modern Fenians than of the ancient ones. Of the artistic side of the cult of the Celts I do not especially speak here. And indeed its importance, especially to the Irish,...
Page 46 - ... been made to realise what it stands for. He does not know that John means John, as the other man does know that Michael means Michael. In that rigidly realistic sense, the pupil of industrial intellectualism does not even know his own name. But this is a parenthesis; because the point here is that the man in the street (as distinct from the man in the field) has been separated not only from his private but from his more public description. He has not only forgotten his name, but forgotten his...

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