Is Taiwan Chinese?: The Impact of Culture, Power, and Migration on Changing Identities

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University of California Press, Feb 4, 2004 - Social Science - 349 pages
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The "one China" policy officially supported by the People's Republic of China, the United States, and other countries asserts that there is only one China and Taiwan is a part of it. The debate over whether the people of Taiwan are Chinese or independently Taiwanese is, Melissa J. Brown argues, a matter of identity: Han ethnic identity, Chinese national identity, and the relationship of both of these to the new Taiwanese identity forged in the 1990s. In a unique comparison of ethnographic and historical case studies drawn from both Taiwan and China, Brown's book shows how identity is shaped by social experience—not culture and ancestry, as is commonly claimed in political rhetoric.
 

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Contents

Whats in a Name? Culture Identity and the Taiwan Problem
1
Where Did the Aborigines Go? Reinstating Plains Aborigines in Taiwans History
35
We Savages Didnt Bind Feet Culture Colonial Intervention and LongRoute Identity Change
66
Having a Wife Is Better than Having a God Ancestry Governmental Power and ShortRoute Identity Change
134
They Came With Their Hands Tied Behind Their Backs Forced Migrations Identity Changes and State Classification in Hubei
166
Theory and the Politics of Reunification Understanding Past Choices and Future Options
211
Notes
251
References
279
Character List
303
Index
309
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Page xvi - He later earned a master's degree and became curator at the Center for Chinese Studies at the University of California, Berkeley...
Page 1 - Kai-shek, both of them agree that there is only one China and that Taiwan is a part of China.

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About the author (2004)

Melissa J. Brown is Assistant Professor of Anthropological Sciences at Stanford University. She is the editor of Negotiating Ethnicities in China and Taiwan (1996).

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