Is the Holocaust Vanishing?: A Survivor's Reflections on the Academic Waning of Memory and Jewish Identity in the Post-Auschwitz Era

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University Press of America, 2005 - History - 179 pages
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This book explores the development and meaning of a right to personal identity which now exists in human rights law. The book questions how a persone(tm)s personal identity is reflected in human rights law, and what exactly this personal identity is which is accorded legal protection under human rights law. The book considers the issue from a theoretical as well as a a jurisprudential perspective, examining the provisions related the burgeoning right to personal identity contained in the UDHR, ICCPR, regional human rights treaties, in particular the ECHR, and the Human Rights Act in the UK.

The book looks at a number of issues including theories that explain how the person or self is incorporated into law and the legal framework, whether our personal identity can be said to be fixed or fluid and the legal protection available entitling us to keep information about ourselves private. The book analyses the connections between legal interpretations of personal identity and what personal identity means in different disciplines including philosophy, psychology, sociology, biology and neuroscience. The book shows how the legal framework is informed by philosophy and the rational view of the person. As there are different interpretations of what personal identity means, it argues that law is in danger of using a constraining interpretation of personal identity.

 

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Contents

When We Are Gone
3
The Last Cry Will Surely Die
5
A Survivors Yom Hashoah Message
7
Sixty Years of Liberation SixtyFour Years Of Memories
11
Historical Truth Historical Fiction and Holocaust Remembrance
15
The Goldhagen Uproar
27
History and the Abuse of History
31
Eastern European Jews and Their History
33
Elegizer of Polish Jewry
115
My Return to Auschwitz Fifty Years Later
121
A Letter to My Travel Companions
123
Memory of the Future
127
The Debate Is Not Over
129
Remarks at the US Holocaust Museum in Washington
133
What Will Remain of East European Jewry?
135
Yechezkiel Kaufman Reconsidered
141

Kristallnacht
37
The Unfair Question
41
Some Serious Pitfalls In Presenting The Holocaust Facts
47
Where I Differ
53
The Tireless Misleaders
57
Anne Frank and Moshe Flinker
61
God and Evil
67
The SelfInflicted Moral Impotence
69
Random Reactions
71
The Unrelenting Complaint in the Words of Hebrew Poetry
77
How Are We to View God After Auschwitz?
97
Remembrance in Spite of Memory
105
Yisgadal Veyiskadash
107
What Is Our Future As a Jewish Community in America?
147
Toward a PostHolocaust Jewish Identity
149
Galut Nationalism
151
There Is No More Room For a Galut Mentality
157
Meeting The Challenge
161
Renewed Reflections on Selections from Torah
163
How Passover Emerged From Primitive Antiquity
165
The Trauma of Isaac
171
Index
177
About the Author
181
About the Editor
183
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Murray J. Kohn is Associate Professor of Holocaust Studies at Richard Stockton College of New Jersey.

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