Isthmus of Panama: History of the Panama Railroad; and of the Pacific Mail Steamship Company. Together with a Traveller's Guide and Business Man's Hand-book for the Panama Railroad and the Lines of Steamships Connecting it with Europe, the United States, the North and South Atlantic and Pacific Coasts, China, Australia, and Japan

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Harper & brothers, 1867 - Panama - 317 pages
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Page 221 - ... above the upper deck"; the breadth thereof at the broadest part above the main wales, half of which breadth shall be accounted the depth of such vessel, and then deduct from the...
Page 281 - Peru is bounded on the north by Ecuador, on the east by Brazil and Bolivia, on the south by Bolivia and...
Page 18 - The contract was to continue in force for forty -nine years, subject to the right of New Granada to take possession of the road at the expiration of twenty years after its completion, on payment of five millions of dollars ; at the expiration of thirty years, on payment of four millions ; and at the expiration of forty years, on payment of two millions. Three per cent. was to be paid to the New Granadian government upon all dividends declared. The entire work was to be completed within eight years,...
Page 207 - ... any act, neglect, or default whatsoever of the pilot, master, or mariners...
Page 193 - No person can be received on board who is suffering from any infectious disease, and if in the course of the voyage any passenger shall be found to be suffering from a disease of that character, he will be required at his own expense, to find accommodation at any port in which the vessel may happen to be at the time, or at the first port she may reach after the discovery of the existence of the disease. In this case the...
Page 36 - Grande, to meet the advancing work from the Atlantic side ; and on the 27th day of January, 1855, at midnight, in darkness and rain, the last rail was laid, and on the following day a locomotive passed from ocean to ocean.
Page 32 - Transit ; but the weather was so tempestuous that, after several lives had been lost in attempting to effect a landing, they were forced to take refuge in the harbor of Navy Bay. It was then proposed that, instead of waiting for fair weather in order to return to Chagres, the passengers should be transported over the railroad to Gatun, from whence they could proceed up the river in bongoes as usual. There was not yet a single passenger car on the road : an accident like the present had never been...
Page 39 - Obispo, one of its branches, seldom, however, following the tortuous course of that stream, but cutting across its bends, and touching it only at intervals of two or three miles. The line continued upon the right or easterly bank of the Chagres as far as Barbacoas (twenty-five miles from Aspinwall), where it crossed that river by a wooden bridge six hundred and twenty -five feet in length ; from thence it followed the left bank of the Chagres to the mouth of the Obispo River, thirty-one miles from...
Page 193 - Passengers are not allowed to take on board wines, spirits, or other liquors for use during the voyage, an ample stock thereof being provided on board at moderate prices.
Page 34 - ... was again commenced upon it, as well as upon several sections of the road between this point and the Pacific terminus. At times there was a force of several hundred men employed ; but they were mostly Irish, unable to endure the effects of the climate, and, being also badly cared for, their numbers were soon so thinned by sickness and death that the contractor found himself unable to accomplish any part of the contract for the price agreed upon.

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