It Was September When We Ran Away the First Time

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Simon and Schuster, Sep 9, 2008 - Juvenile Fiction - 230 pages
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It's September, the first week of school at John Muir Junior High School, and Paolo has a lot on his mind. He's thinking about finding a place of his own with his brother Georgie and his cousin Billy, running away part-time -- which means they are running away, but still come back home to eat and sleep and read the paper. He's thinking about the upcoming Halloween/All Saints' Day/Mexican Day of the Dead/Chinese Lantern Night carnival, and what booth he, Georgie, and Billy would like to man. He's thinking about Communism and the atom bomb, just like everyone else in Orange Grove, California, in 1951. But most of all, he's thinking about Billy and Veronica, a Chinese girl in his class, who have both become victims of some ofthe community's ignorant but deep-seated ideas about who should be hanging out with whom. And it's this last thought that Paolo, even with Georgie and Billy's help, can't quite figure out.

Suddenly, the boys have a real reason to be running away, and maybe not just part-time.

 

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Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
13
Section 3
17
Section 4
25
Section 5
31
Section 6
38
Section 7
43
Section 8
49
Section 21
130
Section 22
132
Section 23
137
Section 24
144
Section 25
157
Section 26
162
Section 27
169
Section 28
173

Section 9
57
Section 10
69
Section 11
75
Section 12
82
Section 13
91
Section 14
95
Section 15
100
Section 16
105
Section 17
108
Section 18
115
Section 19
121
Section 20
125
Section 29
178
Section 30
185
Section 31
190
Section 32
197
Section 33
203
Section 34
208
Section 35
216
Section 36
221
Section 37
223
Section 38
226
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

D. James Smith lives in California, where he studied with poet Philip Levine. A recipient of a fellowship in creative writing from the National Endowment for the Arts, his work appears frequently in literary magazines, most recently, The Amherst Review, New Millennium Writings, the Notre Dame Review, and Stand. His previous books include a collection of poems, Prayers for the Dead Ventriloquist, and an adult novel, My Brother's Passion.

His novels for younger readers are Fast Company and his first book about Paolo and friends, The Boys of San Joaquin.