It Pays to Advertise

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Duffield & Company, 1915 - Man-woman relationships - 333 pages
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Page 87 - em ? Nothing. Are they any better than any other garter? You don't know — I don't know, but all my life every magazine I've ever looked into has had a picture of a man's leg with a certain kind of garter on it — Boston. So when I go into a store to buy a pair of garters I just naturally say, Boston, so do you.
Page 332 - ... our trademark is better than theirs! We're going to advertise all over the world. That's what advertising means : the power of suggestion — the psychology of print. All you have to do is to say a thing often enough and hard enough, and ninety-seven per cent, of the public'll fall. Say, what kind of garters do you wear? Boston! Why ? Because all your life every time you opened a magazine you saw a picture of a man's leg with a certain kind of a garter on it — Boston ! CURTAIN 376 THE FAMOUS...
Page 90 - I'm for him strong. PEALE. I'm against him. I read one paper, you read another. I think he's a faker, you think he's a great man. But does either of us really know anything about him except what we've read? Have you ever met Roosevelt or talked to him or known anybody who did know him? I haven't, but the point is, whatever we may think, good or bad, we've heard a lot about him, because he's the best advertiser in the world. And that, my son, is the whole secret of it : get 'em talking about you,...
Page 85 - ... advertising, are you? Now, don't get me talking advertising. That's where I live, where I have my town house and country estate, my yacht and motors. That's my home. Maybe you think love is important? Piffle. Advertising, my boy, the power of suggestion, the psychology of print ; say a thing often enough and hard enough and the other chap'll not only believe you, he'll think it's his own idea, and he'll fight for it. Some old gink, a professor of psychology, showed forty Vassar girls the other...
Page 267 - ... And that there are a hundred million people in this country. Why just to appeal to one-tenth of the population, fifty million dollars was spent in magazines last year, and each year people are getting better educated — more people are wanting to read. It won't be long before there are 25,000,000 people buying magazines, and you can reach all of them by advertising — get a new market, a new population to deal with. Think what national advertising is accomplishing! It sells automobiles, vacuum...
Page 85 - Oh, you're one of those guys who don't believe in advertising, are you? Now, don't get me talking advertising. That's where I live, where I have my town house and country estate, my yacht and motors. That's my home. Maybe you think love is important? Piffle. Advertising, my boy, the power of suggestion, the psychology of print ; say a thing often enough and hard enough and the other chap'll not only believe you, he'll think it's his own idea, and he'll fight for it. Some old gink, a professor of...
Page 308 - She led him to the mirror, her hand on his arm. "You're queer," she repeated. "Admit that you look queer.
Page 94 - I'll write ads, I'll conduct a campaign that'll keep your father awake, and in three months at the most he'll be begging for a chance to back us. RODNEY. I believe we'll do it. PEALE. Come on, come on. Let's get busy. What's the name of the soap ? RODNEY. It hasn't been named. PEALE. Well, what is there about it that makes it different from any other soap? RODNEY. I don't know. PEALE. Well, what could there be about some soap that was different...
Page 97 - Love. PEALE. Slush. RODNEY. Money. PEALE [suddenly], I've got it : Superstition — everybody's superstitious. RODNEY. Rot ! I'm not. PEALE. I say, there's a bit of luck for us right at the start — a pin with the head toward you. (RODNEY stoops to pick it up] See, you were going to pick it up ! Everybody is superstitious. Oh, they say they're not, just as you did, but did you ever meet a guy who, if he didn't mind walking under a ladder, didn't hate to spill salt, or else he wanted to see the moon...
Page 267 - ... few. You can't see how it pays, but you do know that it must pay or they wouldn't do it. MARY. Does that mean anything to you ? PEALE. Yes. Does it when you realize that those thirty-one magazines have only about 10,000,000 readers? RODNEY. And that there are a hundred million people in this country. Why just to appeal to one-tenth of the population, fifty million dollars was spent in magazines last year, and each year people are getting better educated — more people are wanting to read. It...

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