It's Nobody's Fault: New Hope and Help for Difficult Children and Their Parents

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Potter/TenSpeed/Harmony, Apr 28, 2010 - Psychology - 320 pages
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People who wouldn't dream of blaming parents for a child's asthma or diabetes are often quick to blame bad parenting for a child's hyperactivity, depression, or school phobia.  The parents, in turn, often blame their children, believing that they're lazy or rebellious.  Even worse, the children with these psychological problems often blame themselves, convinced that they're just bad kids.  In It's Nobody's Fault, esteemed child and adolescent psychiatrist Dr. Harold S. Kopelwicz at last puts an end to  this pointless--and erroneous--cycle of blame and helps parents get the help they need for their troubled children.

Written in an easy, anecdotal style and filled with fascinating stories of real children and their parents, It's Nobody's Fault is an indispensable guide for anyone who lives or works with children who need help.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
 

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Contents

NoFault Brain Disorders
69
Obsessive Compulsive Disorder
91
Separation Anxiety Disorder
98
Social PhobiaShyness
123
Generalized Anxiety Disorder
130
EnuresisBedwetting
155
37
168
Bipolar DisorderManic Depressive Illness
195
Conduct Disorder
233
Pervasive Developmental Disorder Autism
241
Afterword
251
Resources and Support Groups
259
Psychopharmacology at a Glance
267
Ql
278
Index
295
107
298

Schizophrenia
209
Eating Disorders
223

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About the author (2010)

Harold S. Kopelwicz, M.D., is vice chairman of the Department of Psychiatry and director of the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at New York University Medical Center, and professor of clinical psychiatry at the New York University School of Medicine.  He has received many awards, including the 1995 Wilfred C. Hulse Award for outstanding contributions to the treatment of youngsters with behavioral disorders, anxiety, and depression.  He lives in New York City with his wife and three sons.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

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