Italian Popular Tales

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Macmillan, 1885 - Children - 389 pages
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This book is a collection of authentic Italian folktales, transcribed from the oral traditions of the Italian people and translated into English.
 

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Amazing book i would buy this but i dont have anymore time in my free time to read it in one sitting which we know would happem

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Page 246 - The cat began to kill the rat; The rat began to gnaw the rope; The rope began to hang the butcher; The butcher began to kill the ox; The ox began to drink the water; The water began to quench the fire; The fire began to burn the stick; The stick began to beat the dog; The dog began to bite the pig; The pig jumped over the stile, And so the old woman got home that night.
Page 246 - If you will go to yonder cow, and fetch me a saucer of milk, I will kill the rat." So away went the old woman to the cow. But the cow said to her: "If you will go to yonder hay-stack, and fetch me a handful of hay, I'll give you the milk." So away went the old woman to the hay-stack; and she brought the hay to the cow. As soon as the cow had eaten the hay, she gave the old woman the milk; and away she went with it in a saucer to the cat. As soon as the cat had lapped up the milk, the cat began to...
Page 314 - The poor astrologer was very much puzzled, and, as if speaking to himself, but in such a way that the others heard him, he muttered: 'Ah! Crab, Crab, what a plight you are in! ' All who did not know that his name was Crab rose and proclaimed him the greatest astrologer in the world.
Page 280 - Just wait," and came up to the bride and gave her a slap that made her lower her head, and then he gave the horse a kick, and so they passed through the gate and entered the city. The groom and the owner of the horse asked the traveller what he wanted, for he had saved the groom his bride and the owner of the horse his horse. He answered that he did not wish anything, and said to himself, "Two and one make three! that is enough. Now I will go home.
Page 246 - As soon as the cat had lapped up the milk, the cat began to kill the rat; the rat began to gnaw the rope; the rope began to hang the butcher; the butcher began to kill the ox; the ox began to drink the water; the water began to quench the fire; the fire began to burn the stick; the stick began to beat the dog; the dog began to bite the pig; the little pig in a fright jumped over...
Page xix - HOUSEHOLD STORIES FROM THE LAND OF HOFER ; or, Popular Myths of Tirol, including the Rose Garden of King Laryn. By the same Author. With Illustrations by T. Green, cloth, gilt edges, 5*. " We thank the author of ' Patranas
Page iii - ... desires to be well acquainted with a people will not reject their popular tales and local superstitions." The work before us comprises, not the literary tales of Italy, but stories " which, with few exceptions, are presented for the first time in English, translated from recent Italian collections, and given exactly as they were taken down, from the mouths of the people" — hence they are " popular" tales in the strictest sense of the term.
Page 280 - ... the owner of the horse his horse. He answered that he did not wish anything and said to himself : " Two and one make three ! that is enough ; now I will go home.
Page 280 - ... married — is disgusted, and sets out on his travels with no fixed purpose of returning if he finds some fools greater than his mother-in-law, as in the Venetian tale. The first fool he meets is a mother, whose child, in playing the game called nocciole? tries to get his hand out of the hole whilst his fist is full of stones. He cannot, of course, and the mother thinks they will have to cut off his hand. The traveller tells the child to drop the stones, and then he draws out his hand easily...
Page vii - They can neither read nor write, and the traditions of the country are handed down by word of mouth from one generation to another. Some of these traditions comprise lofty ideas ; for these people, though very poverty-stricken, are not savages. They are religious, and declare themselves proud of being Mahometans — this constituting one of the reasons for their contempt of the :,,',-»*--;;t™«!^..THE LATTEK END OF THE TAKIX.

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