Italians

Front Cover
Simon and Schuster, 1964 - History - 361 pages
2 Reviews
In this consummate portrait of the Italian people, bestselling author, publisher, journalist, and politician Luigi Barzini delves deeply into the Italian national character, discovering both its great qualities and its imperfections.

Barzini is startlingly frank as he examines “the two Italies”: the one that created and nurtured such luminaries as Dante Alighieri, St. Thomas of Aquino, and Leonardo da Vinci; the other, feeble and prone to catastrophe, backward in political action if not in thought, “invaded, ravaged, sacked, and humiliated in every century.” Deeply ambivalent, Barzini approaches his task with a combination of love, hate, disillusion, and affectionate paternalism, resulting in a completely original, thoughtful, and probing picture of his countrymen.
 

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Review: The Italians

User Review  - Julian Friend - Goodreads

History, sociology, psychology: this book is a treasure. Read full review

Review: The Italians

User Review  - Ken - Goodreads

My copy of The Italiansis a hard back published in 1964, I really enjoyed it the book is full of anecdotes and idiosyncratic comments. An excellent view of 'the Italians'. Read full review

Contents

The Peaceful Invasion i
1
The Eternal Pilgrimage
14
The Fatal Charm of Italy
41
The Importance of Spectacle
58
Illusion and Cagliostro
74
The Other Face of the Coin
101
Cola di Rienzo or the Obsession
117
Mussolini or the Limitations
133
The Pursuit of Life
176
The Power of the Family
190
How to Succeed
214
The PROBLEMA DEL MEZZOGIORNO
234
Sicily and the Mafia
252
Fornovo and After
276
The Perennial Baroque
299
Copyright

Realism and Guicciardini
157

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About the author (1964)

Luigi Barzini, was born in Milan, Italy, in 1908. After completing his studies in Italy and at Columbia University, he worked for two New York newspapers. He returned to Italy in 1930 to become a correspondent for Corriere della Sera. In 1940 he was confined by the Fascists. With the Allied liberation he returned to publishing and founded Il Globo. Subsequently he served as the chief editor of several newspapers and magazines. His books include Americans Are Alone in the World (1958), From Caesar to the Mafia (1971), and Peking to Paris (1973). He died in 1984.

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