Ivanhoe

Front Cover
Penguin, 2000 - Fiction - 496 pages
58 Reviews
The epitome of the chivalric novel, Ivanhoe sweeps readers into Medieval England and the lives of a memorable cast of characters. Ivanhoe, a trusted ally of Richard-the-Lion-Hearted, returns from the Crusades to reclaim the inheritance his father denied him. Rebecca, a vibrant, beautiful Jewish woman is defended by Ivanhoe against a charge of witchcraft -- but it is Lady Rowena who is Ivanhoe's true love. The wicked Prince John plots to usurp England's throne, but two of the most popular heroes in all of English literature, Richard-the-Lion-Hearted and the well-loved famous outlaw, Robin Hood, team up to defeat the Normans and reagain the castle. The success of this novel lies with Scott's skillful blend of historic reality, chivalric romance, and high adventure.
 

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Review: Ivanhoe

User Review  - Maryann - Goodreads

My copy of this book is old, water-stained, warped and did I mention, old? It was my great uncle's book and I like to think of him as a young man, reading it and getting just as irritated with the ... Read full review

Review: Ivanhoe

User Review  - Dennis Maley - Goodreads

I would be very upset if a teacher selected Ivanhoe for a reading project for my kids. That said, Ivanhoe holds a monster place in the development of the novel. Just the kind of thing a reader might ... Read full review

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Selected pages

Contents

Acknowledgements
vi
The Waverly Novels in Penguin
viii
Introduction
xi
Chronology of Walter Scott
xxx
Further Reading
xxxix
A Note on the Text
xliii
IVANHOE
1
Volume II
133
Volume III
259
Historical note
403
Explanatory Notes
410
Glossary
487
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Sir Walter Scott was born in Edinburgh in 1771. Educated for the law, he obtained the office of sheriff-depute of Selkirkshire in 1799 and in 1806 the office of clerk of session, a post whose duties he fulfilled for some twenty-five years. His lifelong interest in Scottish antiquity and the ballads which recorded Scottish history led him to try his hand at narrative poems of adventure and action. The Lay of the Last Minstrel (1805), Marmion (1808), and The Lady of the Lake (1810) made his reputation as one of the leading poets of his time. A novel, Waverley, which he had begun in 1805, was published anonymously in 1814. Subsequent novels appeared with the note “by the author of Waverley”; hence his novels often are called collectively “the Waverley novels.” Some of the most famous of these are Old Mortality (1816), Rob Roy (1817), Ivanhoe (1819), Kenilworth (1821), and Quentin Durward (1823). In recognition of his literary work Scott was made a baronet in 1819. During his last years he held various official positions and published biographies, editions of Swift and Dryden, tales, lyric poetry, and various studies of history and antiquity. He died in 1832.

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