Ivor Horton's Beginning Visual C++ 2005

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John Wiley & Sons, Feb 2, 2006 - Computers - 1182 pages
  • Popular author Ivor Horton uses his trademark approachable writing style to provide novice programmers with the basic tools as they learn Visual C++ 2005
  • Readers will learn how to program in C++ using Visual C++ 2005-without any previous knowledge of C++
  • More than 35 percent new and updated material covers the new release of Visual C++, and exercises and solutions help readers along the way
  • Demonstrates the significant new features of Visual C++ 2005, providing improved flexibility in developing Microsoft applications in C++
 

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Contents

Chapter 1 Programming with Visual C++ 2005
1
Chapter 2 Data Variables and Calculations
37
Chapter 3 Decisions and Loops
115
Chapter 4 Arrays Strings and Pointers
159
Chapter 5 Introducing Structure into Your Programs
231
Chapter 6 More about Program Structure
271
Chapter 7 Defining Your Own Data Types
323
Chapter 8 More on Classes
399
Chapter 14 Drawing in a Window
707
Chapter 15 Creating the Document and Improving the View
759
Chapter 16 Working with Dialogs and Controls
817
Chapter 17 Storing and Printing Documents
867
Chapter 18 Writing Your Own DLLs
901
Chapter 19 Connecting to Data Sources
921
Chapter 20 Updating Data Sources
979
Chapter 21 Applications Using Windows Forms
1031

Chapter 9 Class Inheritance and Virtual Functions
473
Chapter 10 Debugging Techniques
565
Chapter 11 Windows Programming Concepts
613
Chapter 12 Windows Programming with the Microsoft Foundation Classes
649
Chapter 13 Working with Menus and Toolbars
677
Chapter 22 Accessing Data Sources in a Windows Forms Application
1089
Appendix A C++ Keywords
1131
Appendix B ASCII Codes
1133
Index
1141
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Ivor Horton is one of the preeiminent authors of tutorials on the Java, C and C++ programming languages. He is widely known for the tutorial style of his books, which provides step-by-step guidance easily understood even by first-time programmers. Horton is also a systems consultant in private practice.

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